johnsoj's blog

Dr. Shriver Tribute Exhibit at the University Archives

The passing of Miami President Emeritus Dr. Phillip Shriver marked the end of an era at Miami University. In memory of Dr. Shriver, the staff of the University Archives has put together a small exhibit featuring personal items donated over the years. Exhibited materials include a pair of toy drumsticks from Shriver’s childhood, notes and exams from classes taken with leading American historians Arthur Schlesinger and Allan Nevins, and a draft syllabus and exam from Dr. Shriver’s Miami History course. The exhibit is located in the reading room of the Miami University Archives

The Archives is located in the old Withrow Court locker area, directly across from McKie Baseball Field. There is a single, outside entrance on the north side of the facility. The archives is not directly accessible from the Withrow Court building.
Beginning May 7, the Archives summer hours will be 8am-4pm Monday thru Friday, and by appointment. Everybody is welcome to visit! If interested in visiting or have a research question contact Bob Schmidt, University Archivist at schmidrf@muohio.edu or 513.529.6720

Western College Memorial Archives

The Western College Memorial Archives houses materials from Western College Female Seminary and Western College for Women 1853-1974.

Western Female Seminary was founded in 1853 as the 'western representation' of Mt. Holyoke in Massachusetts, with its dual vision of missionary zeal and low-cost yet high quality education for women. Strongly supported by the leaders of the Presbyterian Church of Oxford, classes began in 1855 with Helen Peabody, a Mt. Holyoke graduate, as principal. In 1894, Western became "The Western: a College and Seminary for Women; in 1904, the word "seminary" was dropped and Western became "The Western College for Women." The school merged with Miami University in 1974.

The Western College Memorial Archives are located in 16 Peabody Hall. Materials from the Archive do not circulate. You may visit Monday - Friday, 1 pm - 5 pm or contact Jacky Johnson at johnsoj@muohio.edu or call 513.529.9695

The book the Western College for Women 1853-1953 by Narka Nelson is an excellent resource about the college's history Western History It provides a broad outline of events at Western such as the fires that burned Peabody Hall and the institutions survival during the Civil War.

The Western College for Women 1853-1953 by Narka Nelson gives particular attention to the personalities and incidents that comprise Western's past.

Miami University Archives

Interested in conducting research about Miami University History?

Visit the Miami University Archives

The Archives contains manuscripts, publications, photographs, and artifacts dealing with Miami University history. It also houses many of the surviving records and publications of Oxford College for Women one of the first U.S. Protestant schools to confer the Bachelor of Arts degree upon women.

The Archives is located in the old Withrow Court locker area, directly across from McKie Baseball Field. There is a single, outside, public entrance on the north side of the facility. The Archives is not directly accessible from the Withrow Court building. The hours of operation are 8 am-12 noon and 1 pm-5 pm. If interested in visiting or have for a research question contact Bob Schmidt, University Archivist at schmidrf@muohio.edu or call 513.529.6720

The Miami Years 1809-1959

The Miami Years 1809-1959 by Walter Havighurst.

The Miami Years gives particular attention to the personalities and incidents that comprise Miami University's past. There is the story of William Holmes McGuffey who came to Miami in 1825 and compiled his famous McGuffey Reader which would sell 120 million copies and made McGuffey's name as familiar as the alphabet. There are also scenes from such dramatic episodes as the establishment of the Miami Triad of Greek letter fraternities and the infamous Snowball Rebellion.

There is the poignant picture of a college divided by the Civil War when student volunteers for both armies left Miami on the same train. We learn how Miami made the transition to co-education, grew from an enrollment of under 200 students to a major mid-sized university, carried on a war training program for 10,000 Navy personnel during the Second World War, and met the rush of veterans studying under the G. I. Bill after the war.

A nation's growth is reflected in this story of growth of an institution of higher learning. But along with outlining the bold strokes of change in American education, Havighurst depicts the men who, by courageously and ingeniously coping with the problems at hand, enabled a college to survive and progress for over 200 years.