messnekr's blog

"Tools for Measuring Research Impact" Workshop

Are you working on a job application or your promotion dossier, and need to demonstrate the impact your work has made? Don’t know the difference between an impact factor and an Eigenfactor? Not sure how to find out which journals in your field are "the best"? This workshop is for you! Workshop presenters will provide an overview of established and alternative methods for assessing the influence of published scholarship.

WHEN: Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 2:00 – 3:30PM
WHERE: Laws Hall 116 (B.E.S.T. Library)

This workshop is appropriate for faculty members and graduate students in all disciplines.  Participants will leave the workshop with an understanding of how to locate and calculate metrics for research impact, including Journal Impact Factors, h-index, Eigenfactor, social media-based metrics, and more. Participants will also gain an appreciation for the limitations of publication metrics and the varied suitability of different metrics for different academic fields and types of publications.

Please contact Kevin Messner at krmessner@miamioh.edu for more information or to RSVP.  We look forward to you joining us!

B.E.S.T. Library services limited Saturday June 27 by building power outage

A building power outage has been scheduled in Laws Hall for Saturday, June 27.  B.E.S.T. Library will be open with limited service that day from 1-5pm.  Computing and other electrical-dependent services will be unavailable.

As a safety precaution, access to materials in the basement book stacks will be available by staff retrieval only.

The power outage has been scheduled by Physical Facilities to replace equipment and upgrade electrical service in the building.

 

"Top 50" Textbooks Now Available at B.E.S.T.!

For the past several years, the Textbook Initiative project has made copies of textbooks in each of the Top 50 highest enrollment courses available on reserve for 2 hour checkout at King Library.  By repeated request, this semester we are expanding this program to BEST Library.  "Top 50" courses in the primary disciplines served by the Business, Engineering, Science, and Technology Library will also have a textbook copy available on 2 hour reserve at BEST.
 
The affected courses for Spring 2015 are below.
 
Books for a variety of other courses continue to be available on reserve at each of the libraries, and we will happily place department- or instructor-owned copies of books needed for a course on reserve at any of the libraries.  Contact Stephen Cox at BEST at 9-7202 or coxs4@miamioh.edu with any questions about placing an item on reserve at BEST.
 
Textbook on Reserve available at B.E.S.T. Library for these courses:
ACC 221
ACC 222
BIO 115/116
BIO 121
BIO 161
BLS 342
BUS 101
CHM 141/142
CHM 241/242
CSE 148
ECO 201
ECO 202
FIN 301
GEO 101
GLG 111
ISA 205
ISA 235
MBI 111
MBI 131
MGT 291
MGT 302
MKT 291
MTH 151
MTH 251
PHY 181/182
PSY 111
STA 261
STA 301

Howe Writing Center Branch Desk Now Open at B.E.S.T. Library!

The Howe Writing Center and University Libraries are pleased to announce we now offer Howe’s writing consultant services in the Business, Engineering, Science and Technology Library in Laws Hall. Located on the main floor, the writing desk will be open a limited number of hours to start, but we hope that providing this service on the east side of campus will encourage students in the technical disciplines to make use of Howe’s services with their class assignments. (As always, students working in any discipline can make use of any of Howe’s locations.) The writing desk at B.E.S.T. will be open Mondays 3-5pm, Tuesdays 4-7pm, and Wednesdays 4-6pm. You can make an appointment on the Howe Writing Center web site, or drop-ins are welcome when the consultant is available.

The Open Data Movement

“Open Data” is a principle that some kinds of scientific and scholarly data should be freely available to anyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright or other limits. Open Data is distinct, but related in spirit, to the Open Access to scholarly publications movement.

The argument for Open Data often focuses on the source of funding for research, stating that when public/governmental funding is used to support research, that research is properly owned by the public at large and should be made publicly available. Consistent with the Open Data notion, U.S. Federal law has long upheld that raw facts are not copyrightable (though the means of expression -- styled papers, tables, charts, and other containers presenting the data -- are).

Open Data is a de facto standard for data in some scientific fields, notably molecular biology. Molecular biologists wishing to publish articles on newly sequenced DNA or other biomolecules have long been required to deposit those sequences in archival databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. This allows other researchers, once the publication and data is released, to view the new sequences and make use of them in their own work; the broad availability of this data has been widely recognized as being critical in advances in modern biology.

Recently the National Science Foundation implemented a policy requiring grant applicants to incorporate a data management plan into their grant proposals. While the NSF policy does not endorse or require Open Data per se, it is hoped the requirement will encourage researchers to carefully consider the long-term accessibility of their research products, which is the fundamental concern of the Open Data movement. The University Libraries Scholarly Commons is available as an open archive for research materials produced by Miami researchers.

Share your views on Federal public access to research policy

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) now invites your input on the *management* of policies to deliver public access to the published results of taxpayer-funded research, to be submitted to the online discussion no later than TOMORROW, January 7, 2010.

*All* are urged to respond to this pivotal opportunity and to encourage researchers, students, and others to weigh in. Your input will be critical in helping the administration to form a deep and balanced view of stakeholders’ interest in ensuring public access to publicly funded research.

The questions before us now are:

  • Compliance. What features does a public access policy need to ensure compliance? Should this vary across agencies?
  • Evaluation. How should an agency determine whether a public access policy is successful? What measures could agencies use to gauge whether there is increased return on federal investment gained by expanded access?
  • Roles. How might a public private partnership promote robust management of a public access policy? Are there examples already in use that may serve as models? What is the best role for the Federal government?
  • (See the full post at http://blog.ostp.gov/2010/01/01/policy-forum-on-public-access-to-federally-funded-research-management/).

    This is the last of the three announced phases of the online discussion. The first two phases focused on public access policy implementation as well as on features and technology. From January 8 to 21, the online discussion will revisit in more detail aspects of the conversation that warrant deeper exploration. To participate, visit the Public Access Policy blog at http://blog.ostp.gov/category/public-access-policy. Comments emailed to publicaccess@ostp.gov are also accepted, but will still be posted to the blog by the moderator.

    General comments, addressing any part of the Request for Information, may be submitted to the Federal Register no later than January 21. See the full notice at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/E9-29322.htm for details.

    via SPARC (http://www.arl.org/sparc)