News & Notes

By: Kevin Messner on: October 25, 2011 11:00 am | messnekr

“Open Data” is a principle that some kinds of scientific and scholarly data should be freely available to anyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright or other limits. Open Data is distinct, but related in spirit, to the Open Access to scholarly publications movement.

The argument for Open Data often focuses on the source of funding for research, stating that when public/governmental funding is used to support research, that research is properly owned by the public at large and should be made publicly available. Consistent with the Open Data notion, U.S. Federal law has long upheld that raw facts are not copyrightable (though the means of expression -- styled papers, tables, charts, and other containers presenting the data -- are).

Open Data is a de facto standard for data in some scientific fields, notably molecular biology. Molecular biologists wishing to publish articles on newly sequenced DNA or other biomolecules have long been required to deposit those sequences in archival databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. This allows other researchers, once the publication and data is released, to view the new sequences and make use of them in their own work; the broad availability of this data has been widely recognized as being critical in advances in modern biology.

Recently the National Science Foundation implemented a policy requiring grant applicants to incorporate a data management plan into their grant proposals. While the NSF policy does not endorse or require Open Data per se, it is hoped the requirement will encourage researchers to carefully consider the long-term accessibility of their research products, which is the fundamental concern of the Open Data movement. The University Libraries Scholarly Commons is available as an open archive for research materials produced by Miami researchers.

By: Andy Revelle on: October 23, 2011 7:35 pm | revellaa

What is Open Access
"Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder."
Peter Suber
A Very Brief Introduction to Open Access
Why Open Access

  • Academic Journals have a 10-year inflation rate of 180%
  • This fact when coupled with shrinking library budgets is limiting access to scholarly research


  • Authors are not paid by scholarly journals. Their compensation is the dissemination of their work and the resulting citations
  • If access is reduced by growing costs, interested parties cannot read and cite their work
  • Open Access makes scholarly work available to any interested party, including policy makers, industry and the public at large

What Can You Do?


By: Eric Resnis on: October 12, 2011 10:56 am | resnisew

Interested in learning about presentations methods other than Powerpoint? Then this workshop might be for you!

Taking Your Presentation beyond PowerPoint
Presentations are often a necessary part of schoolwork and academia, but many people struggle with how to create interesting presentations. We all know that visuals can help to effectively illustrate one’s arguments, but we’ve also all had the experience of sitting through a dull PowerPoint presentation. This workshop will help you learn to use visuals and multimedia to enhance your presentations. You’ll learn the basics of three helpful tools: Prezi (useful for creating presentations); PollEverywhere (helps you increase interactivity); and SlideShare (allows you to share your presentations with a larger audience). You’ll also learn some techniques for making your presentations more interesting and informative. Come test-drive new tools and exchange ideas and advice for creating more exciting presentations!

2011-10-20 - 12pm–1pm – 116 Laws (BEST Library) Register here:

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: September 28, 2011 9:10 am | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

Interested in the latest news and developments in the world of open access literature and scholarly communication? Follow our MU Libraries open access Twitter feed @miamiuOA to stay informed!

Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.

By: Katie Gibson on: August 03, 2011 11:21 am | gibsonke

New faculty are invited to a Libraries' orientation session August 15 from 11:30 to 3:00 beginning in 320 King Library.
Join us for lunch, library tours, breakout sessions o technology, information literacy and e-journals and meet the librarian liaison to your academic department. Lunch will be provided.

Please register online:
RSVP to Emily Liechty (

By: Jacky Johnson on: May 06, 2011 10:00 am | johnsoj

The passing of Miami President Emeritus Dr. Phillip Shriver marked the end of an era at Miami University. In memory of Dr. Shriver, the staff of the University Archives has put together a small exhibit featuring personal items donated over the years. Exhibited materials include a pair of toy drumsticks from Shriver’s childhood, notes and exams from classes taken with leading American historians Arthur Schlesinger and Allan Nevins, and a draft syllabus and exam from Dr. Shriver’s Miami History course. The exhibit is located in the reading room of the Miami University Archives

The Archives is located in the old Withrow Court locker area, directly across from McKie Baseball Field. There is a single, outside entrance on the north side of the facility. The archives is not directly accessible from the Withrow Court building.
Beginning May 7, the Archives summer hours will be 8am-4pm Monday thru Friday, and by appointment. Everybody is welcome to visit! If interested in visiting or have a research question contact Bob Schmidt, University Archivist at or 513.529.6720

By: Jenny Presnell on: April 26, 2011 11:07 am | presnejl

Many Miamians have memories of Dr. Shriver during his long tenure here at Miami. Aside from his presidential duties from 1965-81, he also taught the history of Miami course for many years. He always loved to tell Miami history stories, not just in class, but for many other types of gatherings as well. The university libraries have 3 interviews of Dr. Shriver in our online collections. They were conducted by Dr. Curtis Ellison as part of the Miami Stories Oral History Project for the University’s bicentennial in 2009. The interviews include Dr. Shriver and his cabinet, an interview solely with Dr. Shriver, and an interview with both Dr. Shriver and Mrs. Shriver . Also available is an audio recording of "Mysterious Happenings at Miami,”one of Dr. Shriver’s many lectures. You may also want to read Dr. Shriver's personal history of Miami. See: Shriver, Phillip R., and William Pratt. Miami University: A Personal History. Oxford, Oh: Miami University Press, 1998. (King Reference, King Library, Hamilton, Middletown, University Archives and Special Collections)

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: April 04, 2011 2:33 pm | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

As you may know, the New York Times recently began charging for access to articles on their website. Boo!

You can however, get your New York Times content with us, the Libraries!

Miami University faculty, staff, and students can access NYT articles here.

There are other workarounds and access options available to view this content.

For those who subscribe to the print version of the NYT via home delivery: using your subscription account number you can set up single user access via user name and password. You can get started here.

Additionally, online visitors can still enjoy 20 free articles (including blog posts, slide shows, video and other multimedia features) each calendar month on, as well as unrestricted access to browse the home page, section fronts, blog fronts and classifieds. The free, limited access resets every month: at the beginning of each calendar month, you'll once again be able to view 20 free articles for that month.

Readers who come to Times articles through links from search engines (for some search engines, users will have a daily limit of free links to Times articles), blogs and social media like Facebook and Twitter will be able to read those articles, even if they have reached their monthly reading limit.

By: Ken Grabach on: April 07, 2011 9:26 am | grabacka

The earthquake and tsunami on Japan’s northeast coast had a profound effect upon the country’s infrastructure. The damage at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant was particularly disturbing. The damage to the reactors at this plant have continued to be the focus of attention, for obvious humanitarian and environmental concerns. While another plant in the area, the Dai-ni plant, did not suffer damage to its reactors, the vicinity of the plant was also affected by the earthquake and surge of water. The entire area was scoured of plant cover, even of trees.

The Libraries own a unique collection, with material that would be of interest to anyone wanting to study the landscape of this region of Japan. The Küchler Vegetation Maps Collection is a large specialized collection of maps of vegetation of many regions. It happens that one of several sets on vegetation of Japan covers the affected portion of Fukushima Prefecture. Fukushima-ken Hama-dōri (Futaba-chiku) no Shokusei = Vegetation des Hama-dôri (Bezirk-Futaba) in der Präfektur Fukushima is a set of maps with text of the vicinity of these power plants. Japanese ecologist, Akira Miyawaki, mapped the area in 1975, and published the results in 1976. At that time Plant number I (Dai-ichi) had been built, and Plant number II (Dai-ni) was under construction. Map I shows the entire study area, maps II-IV, and V-VII show the natural vegetation and actual vegetation surrounding each of the plants.

"The Vegetation Map of Fukushima Prefecture" is map 7 of Shokuseizu, Shuyōdō Shokubutsu Chizu. It shows the vegetation of Fukushima Prefecture as a whole. Published by the Ministry of Education, Agency for Cultural Affairs, the series shows natural areas of various prefectures, and the Tokyo metropolitan area.

Two maps also in this collection show the vegetation of the entire country. Nihon no Genzon Shokuseizu = Actual Vegetation Map of Japan, 1975, and Nihon no Senzai Shizen Shokuseizu = Potential Natural Vegetation Map of Japan, 197?, are small scale maps useful for comparison with the larger scale maps above. All of these will have high value for studying loss of vegetation and restoration of the landscape.

By: Eli Sullivan on: March 14, 2011 11:24 am | sullive4 small twitter logo@@muElibrarian

Charlie Sheen has made the news in the past few months for a variety of controversial comments prompting an interview with ABC that sparked further concerns about the actor's health.

So what do you think? Is Charlie Sheen a drug addict? Is he bipolar? Or is his behavior the result of pure, unadulterated Tiger Blood? You decide!

You can find the American Psychological Association's official Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) in King's Reference section. Want to learn more about the effects of cocaine use and bipolar disorder? Check out the titles below:

More titles about cocaine

More titles about bipolar disorder

Watch Charlie Sheen in his younger days in films such as Hot Shots! Part Deux, Wall Street & more. You can find most of these movies by asking at the desk in the IMC on the ground floor of King, but be sure to check the location field to be sure.