News & Notes

By: Anonymous on: September 25, 2015 10:41 am | Anonymous

Sunday, March 16 is Freedom of Information Day.  This yearly celebration is always on or around the birthday of James Madison, who strongly believed in the freedom of information. The Freedom of Information Act, which was enacted in 1966, protects the rights that all American citizens have to federal knowledge.  For more information on this act, come check out Government Information’s Guide to the Freedom of Information Act or access it online. Access to this and many other materials are available to members of the Miami community through the Federal Depository Library Program. “Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.” –James Madison Happy Freedom of Information Day!

By: Anonymous on: August 10, 2016 9:51 am | Anonymous

Miami University Libraries and the Howe Writing Center celebrate National Black History Month with the 25th Annual African American Read-In on Wednesday, February 26th. The Read-In encourages the celebration of all aspects of the African American experience, including the reading of selections from all literary genres, the display of artistic works, music and dance performances, and more! Come join us & share some of your own work or anything that recognizes the talent, contribution, or experience of African Americans. Refreshments will be provided so please pass the word & join us Wednesday, February 26th between 11:30am & 2:30pm, first floor King Library, Howe Writing Center for a multi-faceted Read-In!

For more information, registration, and if you’d like some ideas on things to read, please visit: http://libguides.lib.muohio.edu/diversity

Registration is not necessary, but highly encouraged. And as always, we welcome those who choose to come, listen, and enjoy.

By: Anonymous on: August 10, 2016 9:51 am | Anonymous

When searching for items in the Miami University Libraries catalog, you might find
an item that is available at “SW Depository”. Have you ever wondered what that
was? It is the Southwest Ohio Regional Depository, affectionately known as SWORD.
There are 5 regional depositories in Ohio whose holdings are shared across
academic libraries in the state. SWORD is shared by Miami University, Central State
University, University of Cincinnati, and Wright State University and is located
on the Miami Middletown Campus. Miami University Libraries are continuously
purchasing new items to add to their collections in order to provide the best
possible resources for our students, faculty and staff. Less used items are moved to
SWORD to make room for the more frequently used items. Books requested from
SWORD typically arrive in 2-3 business days and requested journal articles are
received electronically. Miami has over 1 million items in the depository!

A view from inside SWORD shows towering shelves of books reaching 3-1/2 stories
high and 7-1/2 stories long. Books are stored by size and then are barcoded.
Barcodes are stored in the catalog system so items can be retrieved by staff who run a cherry picker down the aisles and up the 3-1/2 story high stacks. The dedicated staff who work in SWORD certainly don’t have a fear of heights!

By: Marcus Ladd on: September 16, 2015 4:48 pm | laddmm

The Walter Havighurst Special Collections staff is pleased to announce the latest additions to the Myaamia Collection Online, eight original land grants from 1823 and 1843 to the Miami Tribe by Presidents Monroe and Tyler and Lafontaine's 1846 addition to the town of Huntington, Indiana.

Land Grant to Jean Baptiste Richardville
Front of 3rd land grant to John Baptiste Richardville in 1843
The land grants were also featured in an Associated Press story on Sunday, December 15th, and the story can be found in news sources across the country! As with the original annuity rolls in the Myaamia Collection Online, each land grant is accompanied by a transcription. We invite you all to explore these fascinating historical documents.

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: September 18, 2015 4:44 pm | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

In honor of Open Access Week 2013 (October 21-25), we will be profiling an influential figure in the scholarly communication landscape each day.


Friday, October 25

Jason Priem

Education

  • M.Ed. in Social Studies Education, University of Florida, 2002
  • Ph.D. in Information and Library Science, UNC-Chapel Hill (2009- )

Current Positions

  • Co-founder, ImpactStory (2011- )
  • Doctoral student in information science, UNC-Chapel Hill (2009- )

Notable Affiliations

  • Ubiquity Press Advisory Board member (2011- )
  • Program committee, ScienceOnline 2012 conference (2011)
  • Lead organizer, altmetrics 12 workshop at ACM Web Science Conference (2012)
  • Peer reviewer for Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, PLoS ONE, and Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.

Notable Publications

  • “Scientometrics 2.0: new metrics of scholarly impact on the social Web”. First Monday, 2010. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.5210%2Ffm.v15i7.2874.
  • “Altmetrics in the wild: using social media to explore scholarly impact”. arXiv preprint, 2012. Available at http://arxiv.org/abs/1203.4745.
  • “The power of altmetrics on a CV”. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 2013. Available at http://mail.asis.org/Bulletin/Apr-13/AprMay13_Piwowar_Priem.pdf.

Interesting Facts

  • Priem has worked as a middle school teacher, freelance web designer, and instructional designer for online courses.  
  • Priem is the co-founder of ImpactStory, a free, open-source web-based tool that allows researchers to aggregate alternative metrics for their scholarship.   
  • One of a group of scholars who coined the term “altmetrics”, short for alternative metrics, or measuring scholarly impact over the social web instead of through traditional citation. 

More Information

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: September 18, 2015 4:44 pm | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

In honor of Open Access Week 2013 (October 21-25), we will be profiling an influential figure in the scholarly communication landscape each day.


Thursday, October 24

Heather Joseph

Education

  • B.S. in Journalism, University of Maryland College Park, 1989
  • M.A. in Business Administration, University of Maryland, 1998

Current Positions

Notable Affiliations

  • Board of Directors, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
  • Organizer/advocate for Access2Research
  • One of four witnesses who testified at the Congressional Hearing on the Fair Copyright in Research Works Act

Notable Publications

Interesting Facts

More Information

  • Heather Joseph's blog (via SPARC)
  • Heather Joseph on Twitter (@hjoseph)
By: Jennifer Bazeley on: September 18, 2015 4:45 pm | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

In honor of Open Access Week 2013 (October 21-25), we will be profiling an influential figure in the scholarly communication landscape each day.


Wednesday, October 23

photo of Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Education

  • M.F.A. in English, Louisiana State University, 1991
  • Ph.D. in English, New York University, 1998

Current Positions

  • Director of Scholarly Communication, Modern Language Association
  • Visiting Research Professor of English, New York University
  • Professor of Media Studies, Pomona College

Notable Affiliations

  • Co-founder/co-editor of the digital scholarly network, MediaCommons
  • Board of Directors, Council on Library and Information Resources
  • Advisory Board, Open Library of the Humanities
  • Chair, Publications Committee, Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations
  • Executive Committee, Association for Computers and the Humanities

Notable Publications

  • Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy. NYU Press, 2011. Pre-pub version available at http://mcpress.media-commons.org/plannedobsolescence/.
  • The Anxiety of Obsolescence: the American Novel in the Age of Television, Vanderbilt University Press, 2006.
  • "Giving It Away: Sharing and the Future of Scholarly Communication”. Journal of Scholarly Publishing, 2012. Available at http://scholarship.claremont.edu/pomona_fac_pub/62/.
  • “Peer-to-Peer Review and the Future of Scholarly Authority”. Social Epistemology, 2010. Available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02691728.2010.498929.
  • “The Humanities, Done Digitally”. The Chronicle of Higher Education, special section on technology, 2011. Available at http://chronicle.com/article/The-Humanities-Done-Digitally/127382/.

Interesting Facts

  • Fitzpatrick is a self-described Mac “zealot”.
  • She was named one of “12 Tech Innovators Who Are Transforming Campuses” by The Chronicle of Higher Education in 2012.
  • Fitzpatrick’s book Planned Obsolescence went through an open peer review process prior to publication.

More Information

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: September 18, 2015 4:45 pm | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

In honor of Open Access Week 2013 (October 21-25), we will be profiling an influential figure in the scholarly communication landscape each day.


Tuesday, October 22

Jeffrey Beall

Education

  • M.A. (English), Oklahoma State University, 1987
  • M.S.L.S. (Library Science), University of North Carolina, 1990

Current Position

  • Scholarly Initiatives Librarian / Associate Professor, Auraria Library, University of Colorado, Denver

Notable Affiliations

  • Member of the Society for Scholarly Publishing
  • Vice Chancellor's Advisory Committee for Reappointment, Tenure, and Promotion (University of Colorado, Denver)
  • Member, Editorial Board, Cataloging & Classification Quarterly (2005-2012)
  • Member, Program for Cooperative Cataloging liaison to the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services, Subject Analysis Committee (2010-2012)

Notable Publications

Interesting Facts

  • In 2013, Beall's well-known list of predatory publishers prompted a few of the publishers on the list to threaten him with lawsuits.
  • Beall combines his interest in digital photography and Wikipedia by photographing properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Colorado, and uploading them to the corresponding pages in Wikipedia.
  • Beall is a former Peace Corps volunteer and has lived in five states and four foreign countries.

More Information

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: September 18, 2015 4:46 pm | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

In honor of Open Access Week 2013 (October 21-25), we will be profiling an influential figure in the scholarly communication landscape each day.


Monday, October 21

photo of Peter Suber

Peter Suber

Education

  • Ph.D. in Philosophy, Northwestern University, 1978
  • J.D., Northwestern University, 1982

Current Positions

  • Director of the Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication
  • Director of the Harvard Open Access Project
  • Faculty Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society
  • Senior Researcher at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)
  • Open Access Project Director at Public Knowledge
  • Research Professor of Philosophy at Earlham College

Notable Affiliations

  • Member of the Academic Steering & Advocacy Committee of the Open Library of Humanities (OLH)
  • Member of the Board of Enabling Open Scholarship (EOS)
  • Member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Scholarly and Research Communication
  • Member of the Editorial Board of the Open Access Directory (OAD)
  • Member of the Advisory Board of the Open Knowledge Foundation, and the Advisory Council for its Open Definition
  • Member of the OA Advisory Board of Open Humanities Press

Notable Publications

Interesting Facts

  • Considered by many to be the leader of the open access movement.
  • According to Wikipedia, Suber worked as a stand-up comic from 1976-1981, including an appearance on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" in 1976.
  • Lingua Franca magazine named Suber one of Academia’s 20 Most Wired Faculty in 1999.
  • With one exception, all of Suber’s publications are open access.

More Information

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: September 18, 2015 4:46 pm | bazelejw small twitter logo@@jwbazeley

In celebration of Open Access Week (October 21-25), CELTUA and the Miami University Libraries will be presenting a panel discussion "Publish, Don't Perish: The Future of Scholarly Publishing and Open Access".

When: Wednesday, 10/23/13, from 3:00pm – 4:30pm

Where: the Center for Digital Scholarship on the 3rd Floor of King Library.

We will continue the discussion informally at a hosted reception from 4:30-5pm.

What do the phrases "scholarly communication" and "open access" really mean? The term "scholarly communication is frequently used as shorthand for peer-reviewed publishing, traditionally the primary way a discipline advances. However, the phrase actually encompasses many more applications, including how scholars find information, create knowledge, and communicate among themselves, with students, and beyond the academy with other audiences. New digital capabilities including electronic publishing, social media, institutional repositories, and copyright legislation are profoundly impacting traditional scholarly communication. This shifting landscape affects researchers, instructors, students, publishers, scholars, and librarians dramatically. In 2012-2013, the Scholarly Communication FLC discussed these and other issues and will be sharing their thoughts in this moderated panel discussion. All four members of the panel as well as the moderator participated in the FLC.