News & Notes

By: Jen Waller on: October 23, 2014 10:15 am | wallerjl @@jenniferwaller

 

Have you done work you’re proud of?

Do you want to share it so that others can read and build upon it?

Institutional repositories are widely used as to make scholarship freely accessible on the Web. The Scholarly Commons is Miami University’s institutional repository, and students are now eligible to deposit their work there. Share your work with the world, and reap the rewards of an open system of scholarship!
 

Familiarize yourself with Miami’s Scholarly Commons!
The Scholarly Commons makes research available to a wider audience, and it is administered by the Miami University Libraries to help ensure its long-term preservation. Familiarize yourself by visiting the Scholarly Commons at http://sc.lib.miamioh.edu, and then browse the F.A.Q. at http://sc.lib.miamioh.edu/FAQ.html. The Scholarly Commons is open to any Miami University faculty member, student, department, lab, research unit, or staff member. Submission is easy, and the Scholarly Commons accepts many different kinds of files. Anyone with access to the Internet and a web browser can search, view, and download items from the Scholarly Commons.
 

If you're an undergraduate student, talk with your professors about sponsoring your work!
Undergraduate work submitted to the Scholarly Commons requires a faculty sponsor. The sponsor should be the professor who is most familiar with the work you would like to submit and who can vouch for its originality and quality. Your professors will be happy to help you get your work out there, and the process is easy. So ask a professor today! Your work will help increase Miami University’s visibility, prestige, and public value. Even better, it will help you by providing a place where you can showcase your work!
 

Understand why institutional repositories such as the Scholarly Commons are important!
View a 3 ½ minute video about institutional repositories on YouTube to better understand how institutional repositories work and why they’re important. This short video is from James Neal at Columbia University, and the same concepts apply to Miami’s Scholarly Commons. Just go to http://youtu.be/Ang4XnG3n6Q.

 

Follow the conversations on Twitter!
Follow @miamiuoa, @miamiulibraries, @R2RC, and @SPARC_NA to keep up with ongoing developments about open access and institutional repositories. #oaweek

 
Image credit: 2008-01-26 (Editing a paper) - 19 © Nic McPhee. Used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license. 
By: Eric Weaver on: October 22, 2014 6:28 pm | weavered

The Infinite Symphony

We've added new music to our Spotify playlist, including pieces by Shostakovich, Strauss, Bruckner, Vaughan Williams, Franck, and more. There are now 80 pieces and over 70 hours of music. Listen here: The Infinite Symphony

If you need a Spotify account, click here: https://www.spotify.com/us/signup/

Happy listening!

By: Andy Revelle on: October 22, 2014 4:43 pm | revellaa

Have you ever tried to read an article, only to be asked to pay? 

Being unable to access an article is called “hitting a paywall.” Paywalls hide knowledge and stifle innovation.  Libraries help by subscribing to journals and magazines,  but no single university can afford to subscribe to everything published.  Open access materials can help alleviate students hitting these paywalls.

 

What can I do to help remove paywalls that act as barriers to research?

  • Use the Open Access Button: The Open Access Button lests users track when they are denied access to research. By clicking the button in your bookmarks bar, the Open Access Button will help you get the research you want and add papers you still need to your wishlists. Download the bookmarklet, the free mobile app, or the free web app at http://www.openaccessbutton.org.
  • Learn more about the problem: Visit the Right to Resarch coalition's website at http://www.righttoresearch.org. There you can get up to speed on everything fromt he challenges students face to the impact of limited and how we can solve the problem. Sign the Student Statement on the Right to Research and find ideas to take action on as an individual or as a group. Get your organizations, student government, and friends on board. There is strength in numbers.
  • Encourage your professors to make their own work open: As students, you have a crucial role in making Open Access a reality because you know firsthand that you're expected to cite articles from scholarly journals when you write papers. The open access issue is a complicated one for some professors, but they may be encouraged to hear students asking questions about open access. Students - who read, rely on, and write for scholarly publications - have the power to change the way research is exchanged.
  • Follow the conversations on Twitter at #oaweek@miamiuoa, @miamiulibraries, @R2RC and @SPARC_NA to keep up with the ongoing developments about open access

 

 

By: Jennifer Bazeley on: October 21, 2014 10:19 am | bazelejw @@jwbazeley

What are Open Educational Resources (OER)?

They’re teaching, learning, and research resources released under an open license that permits their free use and repurposing by others. OER can be textbooks, courses, lessons plans, videos, software, lab notebooks, or any other material that supports access to knowledge.

Why are they important?

Traditional print textbook costs have risen at triple the rate of inflation over the last ten years, even though technology has created new opportunities to bring these costs down. Students often end up paying more than $1,000 a year for textbooks that are used only for one course and become outdated quickly. OER are an alternative to traditional textbooks that can help to lower student costs for higher education.

How can undergraduates support the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) at Miami University?

Ask your professors about using OER in the courses you are enrolled in!

Visit the Creative Commons Education web page at http://creativecommons.org/education. There you can watch videos, read case studies, and get up to speed on ways we can solve the problem. The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) also maintains a web page with extensive information and resources about OER at http://www.sparc.arl.org/issues/oer.

Get involved with OhioPIRG Students

Ohio Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) Students is an independent, statewide student organization that works on many issues of concern to students, including the high cost of textbooks. At the OhioPIRG Students’ website at http://ohiopirgstudents.org/ you can get involved in making textbooks more affordable by signing the Textbook Rebellion Petition (http://ohiopirgstudents.org/campaigns/oh/make-textbooks-affordable) or even starting a PIRG chapter on Miami’s campus.

Get involved in Open Education Week

With support from CELTUA and the Miami University Libraries, a group of 16 Miami faculty members, students, staff, and librarians have been exploring issues surrounding OER. Open Education Week takes place March 9 – 13, 2015, and the group is looking for students to help make the week a success. Kirsten Fowler serves both as ASG  Secretary for Academic Affairs and as a member of the group exploring OER. To get started, email Kirsten about your interest at fowlerkk@miamioh.edu.

Follow the conversations on Twitter

Follow @miamiuoa, @miamiulibraries, @R2RC, and @SPARC_NA to keep up with ongoing developments about open access and OER. #oaweek

 
By: Andy Revelle on: October 20, 2014 10:03 am | revellaa

Generation Open LogoAre you Generation Open?

Are you tired of hitting paywalls when you're doing research? 
Are you frustrated with the high price of textbooks? 
Do you want to share your work openly with others across the world? 


If so, then YOU are Generation Open. Join the Miami University Libraries and institutions around the world as we celebrate Open Access Week from October 20th through October 26th. Stop by the "Generation Open" table to talk about the issues and learn how you can help create a more open system of scholarship.

Monday, October 20th, 10am – 5pm: Armstrong Student Center

Tuesday, October 21st, 10am – 4pm: Bell Tower

Wednesday, October 22, 10am – 4pm: Armstrong Student Center

Thursday, October 23, 10am – 4pm: King Café

For more information see http://bit.ly/MUOAWeek or talk to any librarian. And follow the conversation on Twitter at #oaweek. Follow @miamiuoa@miamiulibraries@R2RC, and@SPARC_NA to keep up with ongoing developments about open access. Also, watch this blog all week for additional posts relating to open access.

By: Laura Birkenhauer on: October 19, 2014 12:08 pm | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

Couldn't make it to the inaugural book club meeting? No problem! Sign up to attend our second meeting of the year, November 11 from 6-7:30 pm: http://tinyurl.com/Q9DYMJW This time around, in keeping with the YA theme, we’re reading The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. 
 
Inspired by The Prestige by Christopher Priest and Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrel by Susanna Clarke, and beginning as a National Novel Writing Month Project for Morgenstern, The Night Circus chronicles Le Cirque des Rêves, an awe-inspiring circus that is only open at night, and a competition between its two dueling young magicians, Celia and Marco. Celia and Marco soon find themselves falling in love – but, unbeknownst to them both, this is a dangerous game in which only one can be left standing. Lovers of fantasy, magic and romance will enjoy this award winning bestseller and debut novel! 
 
Register to attend at http://tinyurl.com/Q9DYMJW. A limited number of free copies of the book are available, and refreshments will be provided! 
 
We hope to see you there!
 
 
Join our Goodreads.com group and continue the conversation at https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/145115-second-year-book-club
 
This event is cosponsored by the University Libraries, Second Year Programs, and the Family Fund. 
 
By: hartsea on: October 12, 2014 2:20 pm | hartsea

As we are commemorating the Freedom Summer 50th anniversary, you might be interested in checking out our We were prepared for the possibility of death: Freedom Riders in the South collection.  This collection has 4285 images and documents related to the Freedom Riders of 1961.  The collection comes from the Federal Bureau of Investigation Library.  Freedom Riders were civil rights activists that rode interstate buses into the segregated South to test the United States Supreme Court decision in Boynton v. Virginia. Boynton had outlawed racial segregation in the restaurants and waiting rooms in terminals serving buses that crossed state lines. 

This collection allows you to both browse and search the collection.  You can search by keywords, document titles, author, and place names.

You might also be interested in a documentary in our collection called American Experience: Freedom Riders.

By: Eric Weaver on: October 08, 2014 3:11 pm | weavered

Miami community members have access to Naxos Music Library, a streaming database which includes over 100,000 CD-length classical, jazz, and world music recordings. If you don't know where to begin, here are some suggested 2014 releases from allmusic.com's editors. (Note: 5 simultaneous users are allowed.)

Antonio Pappano - Sacred Verdi
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=5099998452750

Atlanta Symphony Orchestra / Robert Spano - Sibelius: Symphonies Nos. 6 & 7; Tapiola
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=ASO1004

Manfred Honeck / Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra - Richard Strauss: Don Juan; Death and Transfiguration; Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=FR-707SACD

Barokksolistene / Bjarte Eike - The Image of Melancholy
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=BIS-2057

Jakob Lindberg - Jacobean Lute Music
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=BIS-2055

Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra / JoAnn Falletta - Glière: Symphony No. 3 "Il'ya Muromets"
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=8.573161

Jean-Efflam Bavouzet / BBC Philharmonic Orchestra / Gianandrea Noseda - Prokofiev: Piano Concertos Nos. 1-5
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=CHAN10802-03

Jenny Lin / Stravinsky: Solo Piano Works
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=Steinway30028

Lisa Friend / Mark Kinkaid / Anna Stokes - Luminance: Solo and Duo Works for Flute & Piano
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=CHRCD073

The Brodsky Quartet - New World Quartets
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=CHAN10801

Anima Eterna Orchestra / Jos van Immerseel - Ravel: Ma mère l'oye; Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=ZZT343

L'Arpeggiata / Philippe Jaroussky / Christina Pluhar - Music for a While: Improvisations on Purcell
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=825646397242

Leif Ove Andsnes / Mahler Chamber Orchestra - The Beethoven Journey: Piano Concertos Nos. 2 & 4
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=886443876699

Teodor Currentzis - Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=886443899575

Jonas Kaufmann - Schubert: Winterreise
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=886444231572

Anonymous 4 - David Lang: Love Fail
http://miamiuni.naxosmusiclibrary.com/catalogue/item.asp?cid=CA-21100

 

See more suggestions here:

http://www.allmusic.com/newreleases/editorschoice/

 

By: Marcus Ladd on: October 06, 2014 8:41 am | laddmm

Mark Levy, at right

Mark Levy, at right

During the summer of 1964, the Western College campus in Oxford, Ohio served as the training ground for a remarkable undertaking: the coordinated and determinedly peaceful effort to register African-Americans to vote in the hostile and heavily segregated state of Mississippi. Most of the volunteers were white college students who felt a personal calling to support the civil rights of beleaguered African-Americans. A few were themselves African-Americans. Three young men – two white, one black – left Oxford for Mississippi and were never seen alive again.

But there was more to that summer than those three tragic deaths. There were many acts of individual courage, many acts of connection and enlightenment, and many lives, both of Mississippi residents and of volunteers that were forever changed by the experience of that summer. Next weekend about 50 of those volunteers will return to Oxford to remember that summer and to share the impact on their lives during a special reunion and 50th anniversary conference.

On Friday, Oct. 10, three of them will share their stories with us in a panel presentation, “Telling Our Stories: Building the Freedom Summer Legacy,” beginning at 4:15 p.m. This panel serves as the Second Annual Special Collections Lecture, highlighting the Freedom Summer Archive in the Western College Memorial Archives.

Carole Gross Colca, in front with children

Carole Gross Colca, in front with children

Our three guests – Carole Gross Colca, Mark Levy and Roland Duerksen – have all donated personal materials to the Freedom Summer Archive. During the panel presentation they’ll talk about the impact of Freedom Summer on their lives, as well as why they felt it was important to preserve and share the documents of that experience.

The fall exhibit in the Special Collections gallery showcases materials they have donated. “Stories of Freedom Summer from the Western College Memorial Archives” will be on view before and after the panel presentation and through the remainder of the semester, until December 12.

Please join us on October 10 from 4 to 6 p.m. for a fascinating presentation, followed by a reception and an opportunity to view the exhibit and interact with our speakers. The event is free and open to the public.

Elizabeth Brice
Assistant Dean for Technical Services & Special Collections

Prof. Roland Duerksen, at right behind children

Prof. Roland Duerksen, at right behind children