News & Notes

By: hartsea on: March 22, 2010 9:07 am | hartsea

The Women’s Read-in is in its 4th year at the Libraries. It is co-sponsored by the Women's Center and is held in honor of Women's History Month. All members of the University and Oxford communities are encouraged to participate and attend. We invite everyone to celebrate the literary works of women by selecting a short minute passage to share -- poetry, prose, letters, or portions of a novel. Original work is also welcome! The event this year will be held on Thursday March 25 from 11am-3pm in the IMC area of King Library (ground floor).

Sign up to read here!

We will be having themed “hours” at the read in. Our themed hours for this year will be one on women in science and another on LGBT literature.

If you're still looking for something to read, check out this guide that we've created.

You might also want to check out the Orange Prize for Fiction's 2010 Longlist for inspiration. The Orange prize for fiction is the UK's annual book award for fiction written exclusively by woman, which this year celebrates its 15th anniversary.

See below to see what other people will be reading at the Women's Read-In.

We hope to see you there!

By: hartsea on: March 15, 2010 12:56 pm | hartsea

The Literary Research Guide (edited by James Harner) is a selective, annotated guide to reference sources essential to the study of British literature, literatures of the United States, other literatures in English, and related topics. It contains over 1,000 entries, including electronic resources, and is updated regularly. It includes information about internet sources, biographical sources, bibliographies, dissertations, etc. It mostly includes sources related to literature written in English, but there's a Comparative Literature section as well as other literature-related topics, such as the performing arts. It was previously available only in print, but there is now an online version. You can find it on the English Subject Guide under the Reference tab. Here's a direct link.

By: hartsea on: March 14, 2010 1:34 pm | hartsea

I just finished reading The Blythes are Quoted by L.M. Montgomery (King Library PR9199.3.M6 B59 2009). As a fan of her work, I found it to be a great read (though I'll admit I might not be the most impartial fan). This book is the last work of fiction that L.M.Montgomery prepared for publication before her death in 1942, but it was never before published in its entirety. Previous editions (with a different title) did not include many of the poems and short vignettes included in this edition. You can find an article with more details on this edition here.

The book is set up to provide you glimpses into the later years of the Blythe family interspersed with short stories about other people living in the same community who knew the Blythes. Readers who only read the first couple of Anne of Green Gables books (or only saw the films) might find some of the darker stories included in this edition to be a bit of a surprise. If you've read some of her other novels and her numerous short stories, you'll be less surprised by some of the themes included here (lost love, revenge, orphans, adultery, war, death, etc). These stories show L.M. Montgomery's humor, insight into ordinary people's lives and thoughts, and her lovely descriptions of nature (okay, some of the descriptions veer into purple prose but I like her passion for the beauty in life).

If you're interested in reading more about L.M.Montgomery, here are some recent titles you might like:

100 years of Anne with an "e" : the centennial study of Anne of Green Gables. King Library PR9199.3.M6 A574 2009.

Lucy Maud Montgomery: the gift of wings. King Library PR9199.3.M6 Z845 2008.

Looking for Anne of Green Gables: the story of L.M. Montgomery and her literary classic. King Library PR9199.3.M6 Z68 2008.

I'll leave you with words from one of the poems included in this book:

Friend o' mine, in the year oncoming
I wish you a little time for play,
And an hour to dream in the eerie gloaming
After the clamorous day.

By: Eric Resnis on: March 01, 2010 8:39 am | resnisew

The Miami University Libraries are hosting the Digital Literacy Contest. $400 in cash prizes available. The contest is free and open to all students. Afterwards the library will provide pizza and drinks for contest participants.

Contestants will have 30 minutes, 20 questions and Internet access. Correct answers earn points, and incorrect answers are penalized. The highest score wins.

The contest is Wed Mar 24 from 5-6pm in King Library's Kamm Instruction Room (room 110). Students must be present to compete. Those interested in the contest should register soon as space is very limited.

Student organizations can also send groups of 2-3 people to compete for $250 that will be donated to a charity of their choice.

Register online at: http://www.DigitalLiteracyContest.org OR
edit and text the following to 41411: signmeup uniqueid@muohio.edu.

For more information contact Eric Resnis at resnisew@muohio.edu or 9-7205. Funding assistance for this event is provided by the Miami University Special Events Fund.

By: hartsea on: February 18, 2010 1:32 pm | hartsea

This workshop, jointly produced by the University Libraries and the Howe Center for Writing Excellence, will provide an overview of the citation process. The workshop is open to everyone, but we think it will be especially helpful for international students. Kate Francis, Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, and Eric Resnis will be presenting. We will talk about why citations are needed, how to cite, and resources that can be utilized. Feel free to come with your questions. The workshop will be on 2/23 from 4:00-5:00pm in King 114. You can register here. Space is limited, so register now!

By: Jason Paul Michel on: February 17, 2010 8:57 am | micheljp @jpmichel

The Miami University Libraries are proud to host the 21st African American Read-In on Monday, February 22nd from 1pm to 3pm in room 320 of King Library. More information -- and a host of books to read and share -- are available online at the Libraries Diversity page.

Register and get more reading ideas here!

By: Ken Grabach on: February 16, 2010 2:59 pm | grabacka


This month the world will turn to Vancouver, British Columbia, when the 2010 Winter Olympic Games take place. From February 12 through 28, skaters, skiers, sledders, snowboarders, and curlers will compete in and around this West Coast city.
  • Olympic.org

    Provides useful information about Olympics activities, links to related sites.

  • Vancouver2010.com

    The official site for the events. Find out about events, about venues, schedules, results, and more. Maps and images of the region are online, and in the maps collection, show the communities and the event locations. The Venues page tells what events are to be held there, and at the Transportation tab, gives directions to the venue with a street map of the arena location.
I created a Google Map to show the venues in Vancouver and vicinity, at Cypress Mountain, and in Whistler. Natural Resources Canada provides this satellite view with a guide to using imagery. Successive views focus on specific areas, and reveal that BC Place, site of the opening and closing ceremonies, and awards ceremonies each night, is visible from space.

New maps in the our collection cover this area, as well. Four of them are by International Travel Maps, based in the Vancouver area:
Finally, a blog, Beyond Binary, by Ina Friend at Cnet, has begun a series of articles on the science and technology of the Winter Games, beginning with one on the issue of preserving snow at Cypress Mountain, site of the freestyle skiing and snowboarding events.
By: Eli Sullivan on: February 05, 2010 9:24 am | sullive4 @@muElibrarian

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jessyrandall/ / CC BY 2.0

It may be cliche for librarians to talk about their favorite books, but I don't remember having a favorite until I read J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye as a junior in high school. Like a lot of teenagers, I related to Holden's frustration of being caught between childhood and adulthood - wishing for innocent eyes like those of his sister Phoebe but having experienced too much of the corrupt adult world to ignore. It's this state of inbetween - of adolescence - that attracts so many teens to this book.

J.D. Salinger died last week at the age of 91, nearly 60 years after The Catcher in the Rye was first published. If you haven't read it, I encourage you to pick up a copy. If you have read it, try picking up one of his other books or checking out some of the copies we have in Special Collections on the 3rd floor of King.

By: gamsbymk on: March 17, 2010 4:16 pm | gamsbymk

The Women’s Read-in is in its 4th year at the Libraries. It is co-sponsored by the Women's Center and is held in honor of Women's History Month. All members of the University and Oxford communities are encouraged to participate and attend. We invite everyone to celebrate the literary works of women by selecting a short minute passage to share -- poetry, prose, letters, or portions of a novel. Original work is also welcome! The event this year will be held on Thursday March 25 from 11am-3pm in the IMC area of King Library (ground floor).

Sign up to read here!

We will be having themed “hours” at the read in. Our themed hours for this year will be one on women in science and another on LGBT literature.

We generally have an attendance of well over a hundred people for the Read-in.

It really is a great event - a great chance to gather together and read and listen to writings by and about women.

Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman's Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

View our GoodReads bookshelf to get inspired.

By: hartsea on: January 31, 2010 2:47 pm | hartsea

Don’t know the difference between an impact factor and an Eigenfactor? Not sure how to find out which journals in your field are the best? Then you might want to come to an upcoming workshop called "Journal Citation Reports and Other Tools for Preparing Your Dossier". This workshop is designed for faculty and graduate students who want to learn more about the citation tools available to help them. We'll cover how to use Journal Citation Reports more effectively. Realizing that not every journal in the Journal Citation Reports, other tools will also be covered. These tools include Publish or Perish, Google Scholar, and WorldCat Identities. At the end of this session we hope you'll have:

• Awareness of the different tools available
• Understanding of the value of these different citation analysis tools
• Ability to select the best tool for any given task
• Understanding of vocabulary like impact factors
• Skills to gather citation information and include them in their promotion documents

This workshop will be helpful for all disciplines. In fact it's going to be led by a Humanities Librarian and a Science Librarian!

Where: King 110
When: February 10th from noon-1:00pm

Register here.