BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter I

  The principal sources drawn upon are listed with reference to specific chapters of this book. Manuscript and pamphlet materials, as well as most of the printed volumes, are in the Miami Collection of Miami University Library. Some folders of pertinent correspondence, clippings, and photographs are on file in the university's archives.

Chapter I. BEGGAR ON HORSEBACK.

  The James McBride Manuscripts Relating to Miami University, edited by John Ewing Bradford (Cincinnati, 1909), were published as part of the observance of the Miami Centennial. This volume contains the Reverend John W. Browne's account of his Eastern tour while seeking donations for the University, the entailing of a college township in the Symmes Purchase and the locating of Miami University, and sketches of the original members of the Board of Trustees. The formal report of Browne's mission, which came to light after more than a century, was printed in the Miami University Bulletin (Alumni News Letter), May 1937. Adoption of the university motto, Prodesse Quam Conspici, is recorded in the Board of Trustees records, September 26, 1826. In the Diamond Anniversary Volume (Miami University, 1899), edited by Walter L. Tobey and William Oxley Thompson, the Symmes patent and the Act of 1794 are reprinted from Laws of the United States, Vol. 1, p. 497. Jane Knox Skinner's bound typescript Background of Oxford Town and Township (1946) contains copies of the Act of 1792, the patent of John Cleves Symmes and an account of the origin of Oxford township in lieu of the College township entailed in the terms of the Symmes purchase; also copies of James McBride's manuscripts, sketches of early Oxford settlers and notes on the first roads in the township. The Journal of the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio (Columbus, 1838; reprinted Cincinnati, 1872) includes James McBride's "Sketch of the Topography, Statistics and History of Oxford, and the Miami University," which described the survey of Oxford and its early settlement, the construction of the Univerisity's first buildings, the organizing of the Board of Trustees and the first faculty, and the University's income in its early years.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter II

Chapter II. FOUNDATION STONE

  The effort to remove Miami University to Cincinnati is detailed in the Diamond Anniversary Volume, pp. 352-59. McBride's speech arguing that the University was permanently fixed in Oxford is included in The James McBride Manuscripts Relating to Miami University, pp. 45-79. A brief report of the infant Miami University and its enrollment appeared in the Philadelphia Register and National Recorder, June 12, 1819. Thomas J. Porter's History of the Presbyterian Church of Oxford, Ohio [1902] contains a biographical ske tch and a silhouette of James Hughes. Francis R. Gilmore's M.A. thesis James McBride (Miami University, 1952) contains a chapter on the important services that McBride performed for the early University. Verna E. Harcourt's M.A. thesis Pioneer Days of Oxford Township (Miami University, 1953) traces the development of the community to 1860. An account of James Dorsey and the "Rational Brethren of Oxford" by Ophia D. Smith appeared in the Miami University Bulletin, January 1946. The booklet Oxford Town, by R. J. McGinnis (Oxford, Ohio, 1930), contains sketches of early settlers, an 1828 list of householders and an account of the incorporation of the village. A reference to the former Indian mound on the site of present Stoddard Hall appears in the Miami Journal, May 1889.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter III

Chapter III. INAUGURAL PROCESSION

  John Scott's The Family History of Robert Hamilton Bishop (1951) follows Miami's first president from his native Scotland to southwestern Ohio. Various volumes of R. H. Bishop's sermons and addresses are in the Miami Collection. James H. Rodabaugh's The History of Miami University from its Origin to 1845 (Miami University, 1933) is a close study of the first Miami years. This M.A. thesis was expanded and extended in James H. Rodabaugh, The History of Miami University from its Origin to 1885 (Ph.D. thesis, Ohio State University, 1937). Virginia Steele Young's M.A. thesis, Times and Life of Joel Collins (Miami University, 1953), includes an account of the locating of Miami University, the first sale of college lands and the construction of the first college buildings.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter IV

Chapter IV. SHADOW OF A MAN

  Robert Hamilton Bishop's intermittent journals and letters, covering the entire period of his life in Ohio, 1824-55, are in the Miami Collection. James H. Rodabaugh's Robert Hamilton Bishop (Columbus, 1935) describes the early years of Miami University and the tensions within the Board of Trustees and the faculty. The Correspondence of Thomas E. Thomas (1909) contains a number of letters to early Miami faculty relating to the anti-slavery movement and Presbyterian doctrine. James H. Rodabaugh's "Miami University, Calvinism and the Anti-Slavery Movement" in the Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, XLVIII (1939), 66-73, gauges winds of doctrine in early Miami. Thorton A. Mills reviewed "The Life and Services of Rev. R. H. Bishop, D.D.," in the Presbyterian Quarterly Review, December 1855. The origin of the old stone (telescope) pier was detailed by R. W. McFarland in the Miami Student, November 1904, and the account was reprinted in the Miami University Bulletin, October 1931.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter V

Chapter V. PRIMER FROM A GREEN WORLD

  The Miami Journal, March 1888, featured reminiscences of McGuffey by four Miami alumni--Charles Anderson, J. W. Caldwell, B. W. Chidlaw and John I. Covington; Chidlaw's sketch includes his being paid five dollars for copying one of McGuffey's rough manuscripts. A thorough account of early Oxford journalism is given in Jesse H. Shera's "An Eddy in the Westward Flow of Culture: The History of Printing and Publishing in Oxford, Ohio, 1 827-1841," in the Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, XLIV (1935), 105-37. In William Holmes McGuffey and His Readers (New York, 1936), Harvey C. Minnich traced the life of McGuffey and the influence of his textbooks. The second volume of Mark Sullivan, Our Times (New York, 1927), begins with a chapter on McGuffey. James H. Rodabaugh's "McGuffey: A Revised Portrait," appeared in the Oxford Criterion, Winter 1933. A letter by John M. Gordon of the Class of 1837, published in the Miami University Bulletin, November 1929, tells of an early student tilt with the faculty. An extensive collection of McGuffey letters is preserved in the Miami University McGuffey Museum, along with some seven hundred copies of the Readers in their various editions.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter VI

Chapter VI. VOICES ON THE THIRD FLOOR

  The voluminous records of the Erodelphian, Miami Union and Eccritean literary societies are in the Miami Collection. A detailed study of the Literary Societies is made in the M.A. thesis of Virgil Davis, The Literary Societies of Old Miami (Miami University, 1950). Ralph L. Treichler's typescript Miami Union Literary Society (1926) is a briefer history. The Miami Journal in its issues of 1887-89 included alumni reminiscences of "Old Miami"; the literary societies are prominent in these memories. The Literary Halls in the 1830's are recalled in B. W. Chidlaw, The Story of My Life (Philadelphia, 1890), and N. R. Johnston, Looking Back from the Sunset Land (Oakland, California, 1898). The student diaries and journals of David McClung, Isaac Anderson, Joseph Brady and Abner Jones contain numerous references to the literary societies in the years between 1843 and 1858.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter VII

Chapter VII. FORTUNES OF THE GREEKS

  The beginnings of the Miami fraternities are recorded in Francis W. Shepardson, The Beta Book (Menasha, Wisconsin, 1927); Walter B. Palmer, The History of the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity (Menasha, Wisconsin, 1906); Robert M. Collett, The Centennial of Sigma Chi Fraternity (Evanston, 1955); and Jack L. Anson, The History of Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity (Oxford, Ohio, 1957). Hinckley Smith traced the development of fraternities at Miami in his Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity (Hamilton, Ohio, 1903). The "snow rebellion" is recorded in the Board of Trustees records and the minutes of the Faculty for 1848. That event was nostalgically narrated by Alfred H. Upham in Old Miami (Oxford, Ohio, 1909), pp. 110-14. An eyewitness account appears in Joseph Brady's student journal, January 12-22, 1848.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter VIII

Chapter VIII. MORNING PRAYERS AND MIDNIGHT REVELS

  The diary of Joseph Brady reflects undergraduate life at Miami, 1843-48. The journal of David W. McClung covers the college year 1982-53. Isaac Anderson's student diary spans the first six months of 1854. Abner Jones' journal treats the years 1854-58. Chapter 34 of E. N. Clopper's An American Family (1950) draws upon the diary of Edward W. Clopper, Miami, 1861, for an account of college life, 1858-61. A sketch of "Old Miami" by David Swing appeared in the Chicago Alliance, July 14, 1877; the account describes his college years, 1848-52. Joseph Fort Newton's David Swing, Poet-Preacher (Chicago, 1909), describes Swing's years in Oxford, 1848-52. J. W. Scott's own account of the origin and early history of the Oxford Female College appears in the Miami University Bulletin, January 1930. Professor Stoddard's lecture notes are in the Faculty File of the Miami Collection. The ceremonial "Burial of Logic" is described in Abner Jones' student diary; it was recalled by Waldo F. Brown in the Miami Student, May 1899. A printed program of the ceremonial burial by the Class of 1856 is in the Miami Collection.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter IX

Chapter IX. A COLLEGE DIVIDED: 1861-65

  To the Diamond Anniversary Volume (Oxford, Ohio, 1909) Colonel David W. McClung, Miami, 1854, contributed a chapter, "Miami in the War." James B. Falconer's diary pictures Miami student life 1861-63. A description of Oxford in 1862 by Richard Butler, editor of the Oxford Citizen, is included in R. J. McGinnis, Oxford Town (Oxford, Ohio, 1930). Edwin W. Brown's "Reminiscences of an Ohio Volunteer," edited by Philip D. Jordan and Charles M. Thomas, in the Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, XLVIII (1939), 304-23, is the narrative of an Oxford youth who joined the "University Rifles," which became Company B of the 20th Ohio Infantry. The first volume of Whitelaw Reid, Ohio in the War (2 vols.; New York, 1868), includes biographical sketches of Miami men who held high military rank: Robert C. Schenck, Minor Millikin, Ben P. Runkleand R. N. Adams; the second volume contains the roster of the 20th Ohio Infantry, along with other Ohio regiments. R. W. McFarland's narrative of the pursuit of Morgan's raiders appears in the Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, XV II (1908), 243-47. The account of McFarland's student who had been one of Morgan's men appears in the Miami University Bulletin, January 1930. Robert N. Adams' "My First Company," an address read April 11, 1905, tells of the forming of the University Rifles, of farewell ceremonies in Oxford and of entertaining for Hamilton, wherethe Northern volunteers parted from their Southern companions and classmates. An address to the Alumni Association, "Miami in the Civil War," by Stephen Cooper Ayres of the Class of 1861, was printed in the Miami University Bulletin, October 1906.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter X

Chapter X. INDIAN SUMMER

  The student diary of W. D. Hancock gives some glimpses of Miami life in 1868. The Miami Student was published 1867-73, and after a fifteen-year interval resumed publication in 1888; the burlesque ceremony of the Peace Pipe during Commencement season is described in the issue of June 28, 1871. "Miami in the 1870's" is idyllically pictured in Chapter 12 of Ophia D. Smith's Fair Oxford (Oxford, Ohio, 1947). President Stanton's 1867 inaugural address, "The Present Conditions and Wants of Miami University," is in the bound volume Inaugural Addresses, 1835-1928. TheBoard of Trustees records show the financial problems of the old college which led to the decision, in June 1873, to close the institution until its debts could be paid off and a balance accumulated for its future. The privately operated "Miami Classical School" with its gathering boys from distant places is described in Carl R. Greer, Old Oxford Days (Oxford, Ohio, 1947), pp. 18-20. Robert B. Stanton's Down the Colorado, edited by Dwight L. Smith (Norman, Oklahoma, 1965), describes Stanton's pioneer survey of the Grand Canyon. H istorical addresses delivered by spokesmen for the alumni connection with the Centennial Commencement exercises, June 12-17, 1909, were printed in the Miami University Bulletin, September 1909.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XI

Chapter XI. AGE AND YOUTH

   During plans for the reopening of Miami University an account of Old Miami appeared in the New York Tribune, August 13, 1884, and was reprinted in the Oxford Citizen eight days later. "An Old College Campus," by Jennie Brooks, in the Western Christian Advocate, April 17, 1912, is an idyllic picture of Miami University in the 1880's. A biographical sketch of Jennie Brooks is included in Jane Knox Skinner, Background of Oxford Town and Township (1946). The reopening of Miami University and the rivalry of McFarland and Hepburn are described in Ophia D. Smith's Fair Oxford, pp. 178-86. Bertha Boya Thompson's M.A. thesis, The History of Miami University from 1873 to 1900 (Miami University, 1954), treats men and events of the Warfield administration and gives an account of the first state to award aid to Miami. Edwin Emerson's 350-page type script An Old College Town recalls the college years of a spirited undergraduate in 1887 and 1888; Edwin Emerson's career is sketched in the Miami University Bulletin, October 1935. The beginnings of football at Miami are recalled in Carl R. Greer, Old Oxford Days (Oxford, Ohio, 1947), pp. 52-53. The first Miami vs. University of Cincinnati football game is reported in the Miami Journal, December 1888; a fuller account of that historic game is given in the Miami Alumnus, September 1948. Reminiscences of the "Dude Faculty" appear, with pictures, in the Miami University Bulletin, October 1940 and January 1941. Reference to the attempt to interest Herbert Spencer in the Miami presidency is made in Ophia D. Smith, Fair Oxford (Oxford, Ohio, 1947), p. 188.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XII

Chapter XII. WIND FROM THE WEST

   William Oxley Thompson (Columbus, 1955), by Professor James E. Pollard of the Ohio State University, gives a full account of the life of President Thompson. Oxford and Miami University at the turn of the century are recalled in Carl R. Greer, Old Oxford Days (Oxford,Ohio, 1947). "Miami in the 1890's" is the final chapter of Ophia D. Smith's Fair Oxford (Oxford, Ohio, 1947). The Lybarger Bill is referred to in the President's Report (Miami University, 1906) and in the Miami University Bulletin, August 1916. The life of R. H. Bishop, Jr., who died in 1890, was reviewed in the Miami Student, March 1891, with reminiscences by Charles Anderson, B. W. Chidlaw, John Shaw Billings and John I. Covington. William J. McSurely's "History of the Library of Miami University" appeared in the Miami University Bulletin, February 1908; beginning with John Browne's collection of books in 1811 it traced the growth of the Library to its catalogue of 24,500 volumes in 1908. The typhoid epidemic of 1900 is referred to in a reminiscence by Stephen Riggs Williams in the Miami University Bulletin, July 1930.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XIII

Chapter XIII. "THE SPIRIT OF THE INSTITUTION"

   Alfred H. Upham described "the Centennial of Miami University" in the Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, XVIII (1909), 322-44. In an M.A. thesis, Guy Potter Benton: His Effect on Miami University (Miami University, 1950), Peter Joseph Vogt treated the years 1902-11. Fielding H. Garrison's John Shaw Billings, A Memoir (New York, 1915), contains Billings' account of keeping bachelor's hall in the dorms and his memories of the Miami library in the middle 1850's; once during a vacation period he made a burglar's entrance by way of a trap door in the roof and had a whole library to himself. The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie (Boston, 1915) recounts Carnegie's response to John Shaw Billings' suggestion that he use his fortune for the creation of public libraries. The history of Lewis Place, since 1903 the home of Miami presidents, is told in Ophia D. Smith, Old Oxford Houses (Oxford, Ohio, 1941). Helen Benton Minnich's memories of Lewis Place appeared in the Miami Alumnus, January 1967. The typescript diary of Katherine Shideler pictures the life of a Miami coed 1904-5.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XIV

Chapter XIV. A FULL-GROWN COLLEGE

   The life of President Hughes is recorded in Arthur C. Wickenden, Raymond M. Hughes (Oxford, Ohio, 1966). Wickenden's The Miami University Y.M.C.A., 1889-1964 (Oxford, Ohio, 1964), deals especially with the years 1910 to 1940. President Hughes' Addresses to the University Staff, 1911-1927, are in the Miami Collection. R. M. Hughes, "The Next Ten Years at Miami, 1925-1935," appears in the Miami University Bulletin, December 1925. In Education, America's Magic (Ames, Iowa, 1946), R. M. Hughes brought together his ideas on education and vocational gui dance. A detailed account of Miami in the First World War appears in the Miami University Bulletin, February 1918. The Miami unit of the Students Army Training Corps is described in the Miami University Bulletin, August 1918 and in a Supplement dated July 1918. The Whaling bequest is the subject of an article in the Miami University Bulletin, May 1915, and is described in detail in the President's Report, June 8, 1915. A Miami chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was in prospect in 1848 when the "snow rebellion" crippled the college; Phi Beta Kappa, Iota of Ohio Chapter (Oxford, Ohio, 1945), tells how the chapter was eventually installed in 1911 under sponsorship of R. M. Hughes and other eminent alumni.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XV

Chapter XV. ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE

   The Miami University Bulletin, February 1922, notes the wide attention given to Miami University for the establishment of a Fellowship in the Creative Arts. Percy MacKaye's article, quoting Robert Frost's letter regarding artists' fellowships, appeared in The Forum, June 1921; it was reprinted in the Miami University Bulletin, August 1921. The Oxford Criterion, Fall 1933, contains articles on Ridgely Torrence by Alfred H. Upham, Mrs. Wade MacMillan and R. J. McGinnis. The Winter 1933 number of the Oxford Criterion includes essays by and about Percy MacKaye. MacKaye's career following his Oxford residence is traced in the Miami Alumnus, July 1950. Ridgely Torrence is the subject of an article in the Miami Alumnus, January 1951.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter VI

Chapter VI. VOICES ON THE THIRD FLOOR

  The voluminous records of the Erodelphian, Miami Union and Eccritean literary societies are in the Miami Collection. A detailed study of the Literary Societies is made in the M.A. thesis of Virgil Davis, The Literary Societies of Old Miami (Miami University, 1950). Ralph L. Treichler's typescript Miami Union Literary Society (1926) is a briefer history. The Miami Journal in its issues of 1887-89 included alumni reminiscences of "Old Miami"; the literary societies are prominent in these memories. The Literary Halls in the 1830's are recalled in B. W. Chidlaw, The Story of My Life (Philadelphia, 1890), and N. R. Johnston, Looking Back from the Sunset Land (Oakland, California, 1898). The student diaries and journals of David McClung, Isaac Anderson, Joseph Brady and Abner Jones contain numerous references to the literary societies in the years between 1843 and 1858.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XVII

Chapter XVII. "ANCHORS AWEIGH!"

   "The University and National Defense" was discussed in the Miami University Bulletin, May 1941. The first steps in a War Emergency Program in the university are described in the Miami University Bulletin, January 1942. The Report of Civil Aeronautics Administration, War Training Service Program, Miami University, covers the period 1942-44. The beginnings of military training and arrival of the first Naval trainees are recorded in the Miami University Bulletin, October 1942. A report on the WAVES at Miami appears in the Miami University Bulletin, March 1943. Naval training in Oxford is reviewed in the Miami University Bulletin, January 1945. A breezy fortnightly newspaper named The Pines (1942-43) and then The Dispatch (1943-44) reported on activities and personnel of the U.S . Naval Training School (Radio), Miami University. A record of Miami's part in World War II, text and pictures, constitutes the Miami University Bulletin, June 1946. A summary of Regulations and Organization of the Naval ROTC Unit, Miami University, was published in 1948.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XVIII

Chapter XVIII. ON THE G.I. BILL

   "The Veteran on the Campus" was discussed by E. N. Albaugh and Robert T. Howard in the Miami Alumnus, September 1947. Student Life at Miami University in World War II was studied in an M.A. thesis (Miami University, 1947) by Martha Francis Church. Charles W. Meinert, American College Life and the Influence of the Korean War as Seen on Student Life at Miami University, is an M.A. thesis (Miami University, 1954). The Alumni News Letter, published in the Miami University Bulletin Series beginning December 1911, made its final appearance in July 1947; in September 1947, the Miami Alumnus began publication with an account of the Alumni Association project of an advisory Long Range Program for the university, under the leadership of J. Paul MacNamara, '29, and C. Ray Wilson, '26. The eventual report of the Long Range Program Committee was printed as a supplement to the Miami Alumnus, September 1949. The opening of Upham Hall was described in the Miami Alumnus, March 1949. The end of "Veterans' Village" was recorded in the Miami Alumnus, January 1959.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XIX

Chapter XIX. THE LIBERATING ARTS

   The inauguration of President Millett was featured in the Miami Alumnus, November 1953. A preliminary report on the Common Curriculum was presented in "Plan for a Common Curriculum at Miami University" by a University committee, 1955. The Common Curriculum at Miami University, published in the Miami University Bulletin Series, June 1963, described the aims and scope of the program and concluded with a discussion of General Education by President Millett. In his wide-ranging The Liberating Arts (Cleveland, 1957), John D. Millett discussed the dual needs of the undergraduate: to grasp the intellectual heritage of Western civilization while seeking preparation for a professional career. Wallace P. Roudebush (1890-1956) is the subject of ten pages of memorial in the Miami Alumnus, May 1956. The newly opened University Center was described in the Miami Alumnus, September 1957 and November 1957.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XX

Chapter XX. THE AVENUES OF LEARNING

   The experimental project in teaching by television was reported in the Miami Alumnus, January 1956. A report on Experimental Study in Instructional Procedures (Miami University, 1957) gave results of the project under grant from the Fund for the Advancement of Education. The end of the historic old Main Building was lamented in the Miami Alumnus, May 1957, and was pictured in the Miami Alumnus, November 1958. A History of the College Curriculum of Miami University, by S. Chester Parker, was issued as a Miami University Bulletin, October 1910. In The Academic Community (New York, 1962), John D. Millett described the component elements of the university--faculty, students, alumni and administration--and concluded that "consensus in action is the test of both freedom and responsibility." The career of Raymond M. Hughes (1873-1958) was featured in the Miami Alumnus, November 1958.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXI

Chapter XXI. THE SESQUICENTENNIAL YEAR

   The Congressional Resolution (H. Con. Res. 185) extending felicitations to Miami University appears in the Congressional Record, House Doc., May 25, 1959, p. 8128. The Miami Student issued a Sesquicentennial Supplement on Charter Day, February 17, 1959. The Miami Alumnus, June 1960, reviewed in text and pictures the events of the anniversary year. The Sesquicentennial booklet Miami, Her 150th Year, lists anniversary events and presents, chiefly in pictures, the University of 1959. What Is a College For? (Washington, 1961), with foreword by John D. Millett, comprises papers given by R. M. Hutchins, Max Lerner, August Heckscher, David A. Shepard and Mark Van Doren at a Sesquicentennial symposium sponsored by the Humanities Center for Liberal Education.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXII

Chapter XXII. MIAMI MURAL

   Accounts of the painting and placing of the schedule Miami Mural are given in the Miami Alumnus, July 1963 and May 1964. The first experiment with a trimester schedule is noted in the Board of Trustees records for 1867 and in the Miami Student, December 30, 1867. Articles on Miami in the Coaching Field appeared in the Miami University Bulletin, January 1941 and March 1941, and in the Miami Alumnus November 1958 and November 1959. The two designations of "Coach of the Year" were reported in the Miami Alumnus, January 1959. During November 1967 the Miami Student ran a series of columns, "25 Years of Winning Football." A column, "End of an Era," summarizing the athletic traditions of Withrow Court, was featured in the Cincinnati Enquirer, March 6, 1968.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXIII

Chapter XXIII. A SENSE OF MISSION

   President Shriver's inauguration and his inaugural address were featured in the Miami Alumnus, December 1965. The Report of the President, 1964-1967, gives a comprehensive account of developments in the university in the mid-1960's. Pros and cons of the trimester calendar were presented in the Miami Student, September 12, 1967. The trimester schedule occasioned not only discussion and debate but also an M.A. thesis: James G. Williams, Oxford, Ohio: Time, Trade and the Trimester (Miami University, 1966). The legends of Fisher Hall were first recorded in the Miami Student, November 20 and 24, 1953, and April 16, 1954. The "Save Fisher" campaign was reported in the Miami Student, March 29, 1968. Miami University Programs for Superior Students (Oxford, Ohio, 1963) described the Advanced Placement program, the Honors program, Undergraduate Fellowships, Scholarships, Prizes and Awards.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXIV

Chapter XXIV. HORIZON

   The Provisional Master Plan for Public Higher Education in Ohio was published by the Board of Regents in April 1965. Fifteen months later, in June 1966, after hearings and consultations, the Board of Regents published a Master Plan for State Policy in Higher Education. The University at the Service of Society (New York, 1966) comprises a discussion held by trustees of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching on the public service responsibilities of American universities. The President's Newsletter (Miami University) issued to the faculty and staff beginning in 1966 takes note of developments in the entire range of Miami University activities and affairs. A feature of the Miami Student, March 29, 1968, was a page of articles describing the p rojected Miami program in Luxembourg.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXV

Chapter XXV. BRANCHING OUT

   Local history in both Hamilton and Middletown is sketched in Memoirs of the Miami Valley, Chicago: Robert O. Law Company, 3 vols. 1919, and in William E. Smith History of Southwestern Ohio, New York: Lewis Historical Publishing Co. 3 vols. 1964. The full text of McBride's argument that even before its material construction Miami University was permanently fixed in the as yet unbuilt town of Oxford appears in John Ewing Bradford, ed., The James McBride Manuscripts Relating to Miami University, Cincinnati, 1909. The Miami University Office of Information has issued annual booklets on each of the branch campuses and their relation to the respective communities. Details of the planning and development of the European Center in Luxembourg appear in Walter Havighurst The Dolibois Years 1938-1981, published by the Miami University Alumni Association in 1982. Middfest magazine, published 1981 by the citizens of Middletown, gives a detailed illustrated account of the annual Middletown International Celebration and of the relationship of Middletown, Ohio, to Luxembourgville in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. A very readable account of civic and industrial development is given in George Crout, Middletown U S A, All-American City, Middletown, Ohio 1960. Its author is a Miami graduate of 1938.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXVI

Chapter XXVI. CAMPUS CRISIS

   Details of the events of April 15-June 14, 1970, at Miami University are recorded in a 52-page typescript "Diary of Disruption," compiled by the Miami University Office of Public Information. This chronology eschews subjective interpreting and evaluation. A brief "Report on the Closing of Miami University," comprising news media accounts, was issued as a Newsletter of the Miami Alumnus, dated May, 1970. Interpretation and evaluation are included in the 30-page "Report of the President's Commission to Investigate the Events of April 15, 1970" and in the 26-page SCAR report "Findings of the Select Committee on the Abuse of Rights." Various viewpoints are represented in the concurrent minutes of the University Senate, Miami University Faculty Council, Miami University Council of Deans, Miami University Council of Student Affairs, and the Miami University Student Senate. Soon after the Kent State tragedy Reader's Digest sent researchers and editors to Kent to gather information on the events of the first week of May, 1970. Interviews with students, faculty, University officials, and the Ohio National Guard were followed by visits to other Ohio institutions--Ohio State University, Ohio University, and Miami University--that had experienced campus disruption. Author James Michener was called in three months after Kent's violent weekend. From his own interviews, observations and researches, along with the accumulated mass of information, came his volume Kent State, New York: Random House, 1971. (n.b. While the Thomas Hume epigraph on the title page of The Miami Years seems contradicted by this chapter, one may reflect that times are always trying, and no path of life can be free of obstacles.)


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXVII

Chapter XXVII. MIAMI WESTERN UNION

   The Miami University Archives contain an accumulation of press clippings, reports from the President's office, and of working papers of the planning team on The Western College of Miami University. The formal report of that committee was published as a special issue of the in-house periodical MIAMIAN, vol. 2, no. 9, Nov. 12, 1973. A detailed review of the first ten years of the Shriver administration at Miami University, written by Phillip R. Shriver, was published as a preface to the customary Annual Report of the President, in September 1975. After summarizing a current self-study of the university, this 35-page account culminates in reporting the visit of an evaluation team of the North Central Association of Colleges. The resulting evaluation was the highest possible accreditation for the longest possible period. "The Western Idea," an attractive informal brochure containing viewpoints of the Western faculty members and highlighting the campus community, the individualized major, and Senior projects, is Miami University Official Publication Series 78, No. 8, January 1980. A colleague's memories of Joseph M. Bachelor are recorded in The MIAMIAN, Nov. 8, 1979. Other Bachelor references appear in the MIAMI ALUMNUS October 1979 and January 1980. The letter from "thirty years after his death" is quoted in the MIAMI ALUMNUS October 1979, p. 3. The student diary of Abner Jones, 1854-58, is in the Special Collections of the King Library. A file of the OXFORD CRITERION, 1933-35, is in the King Library Special Collections.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXVIII

Chapter XXVIII. THE ROAD AHEAD

   The "Million Dollar Campaign" of 1910-20 was announced in the Alumni News Letter of May 1920, with follow-up reports in August 1920 and May 1921. The "Goals for Enrichment" brochure is preserved in the Miami Collection shelves of the Special Collections in the King Library. Recurrent articles in the MIAMI ALUMNUS track the progress of the "Larger Usefulness" campaign from its launching in February 1978 to its successful conclusion in the spring of 1981. Dedication of the Miami University Art Museum is the leading matter of the MIAMI ALUMNUS of January 1979. This article, along with photographs, includes the dedication address, "Crucible of Change," given November 5 at the museum by President Williard L. Boyd of the University of Iowa. Photos in this issue include the principal donors and both exterior and interior views of the building. The continuing growth of the Presidents Club and its vital support of Alumni Association projects is reported in a 6-page feature of the MIAMI ALUMNUS, Summer 1981. Ribbon-cutting and formal opening of the Marcum Conference Center are recounted in MIAMIAN of January 1983. The same publication, p. 21 and p. 30, pictures progress in construction of the Yager Stadium. Removal of the old Spring Street power plant, beside Gaskill Hall, is pictured in the MIAMIAN, January 1983.


BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTES for Chapter XXIX

Chapter XXIX. SLANT WALK MEDLEY--1984

   The Shriver presidential years are reviewed with text and photo in the Miami Alumnus, Summer 1981, and Fall 1981. The Pearson inauguration and the first one hundred days of Pearson administration are pictured and narrated in the first ten pages of the Miami Alumnus, Winter 1981. A James Langley article in MIAMIAN, September 1982, characterizes the new vice presidents in the Pearson regime. A framed reproduction of the Alumni Association "Greetings" to President Pearson now hangs in the upper lobby of Murstein Center. The Marilyn Throne poem appears in the Miami Alumnus, Summer 1981. The MIAMIAN January 1983 reports on two successive women's basketball championships. The Diamond Anniversary Volume (Miami University, 1899) portrays student life in the old North and South dorms, now Elliott and Stoddard halls. The New York Sunday News, October 25, 1959, featured football history at "Miami of Ohio." Construction of Yager Stadium and the new sports complex is reported and pictured in MIAMIAN, January 1983, and in the Oxford Press April 14, 1983. The Parseghian quote appeared in Cincinnati Enquirer, February 11, 1983. "Miami Field, End of an Era" is a double-page spread in MIAMIAN, April, 1983. The MIAMIAN, January 1983 is given almost entirely to computer education. "Miami University in Age of the Computer" is surveyed in a column of the Cincinnati Enquirer, August 22, 1982. Details of the John E. Hull Memorial Room with a biographical profile of General Hull appear in the Miami Alumnus, February 1970 and Summer 1981. The Commencement of 1983 is reported in Oxford Press, May 19, 1983. The Special Collection of some two hundred titles, including all of Orwell's books, in several languages, and a number of critical appraisals.