News & Notes

By: mulfordj on: January 03, 2017 3:01 pm | mulfordj

Weekday Winter Term Hours: 

King Library: 7 a.m. - midnight 

King Cafe: 8 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 

B.E.S.T.: 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Amos: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Art/Arch: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Saturday Hours: 

King Library: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. 

King Cafe: Closed 

B.E.S.T.: Closed 

Amos: Closed 

Art/Arch: Closed 

Sunday Hours: 

King Library: 1 p.m. - midnight

King Cafe: Closed 

B.E.S.T.: 1 p.m. - 6 p.m. 

Amos: Closed 

Art/Arch: Closed 

Additional information and hours can be found here

 

By: mulfordj on: December 19, 2016 9:47 am | mulfordj

Join us for Plug-in + Reboot in King Library on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 from 9:00am to 5:00pm! 

 

More information can be found here: https://miamioh.edu/academics/elearning/faculty-resources/pluginreboot20...

By: friedevt on: December 19, 2016 8:16 am | friedevt @ohiyote

By Vince Frieden, Strategic Communications Coordinator

Jim Bricker does not have big retirement plans. For the time being, he only wishes to spend some time lost in the clouds.

“I remember a day this past summer when I’d just finished mowing and was sitting in a chair watching the hummingbirds and deer and looking up at the clouds,” Bricker recalled. “It was just a perfect moment of contentment – nowhere to be, nothing to do. That and being able to spend time with my wife are what I’m looking forward to the most.”

A native of the Celina, Ohio, area, Bricker began working while still in high school and earned his bachelor’s degree in history from Wright State University. His job prospects upon graduation were not promising.

“In 1971, a bachelor’s degree in history qualified you to work in a factory,” Bricker said.

While his job at Goodyear Tire and Rubber was not all he had hoped for, he had the unexpected pleasure of meeting his wife, Connie, there. In 1978, he followed her to Lansing, Mich., where she did her postgraduate work at Michigan State University. Her career in electron microscopy later led them to the University of Vermont.

In 1986, Connie accepted a job in Miami’s botany department, relocating the couple closer to their families. Bricker, who had been a welder in Michigan and a warehouse worker in Vermont, found work as an assistant carpenter in Oxford.

His break came in January 1987, when a half-time position opened up in the Walter Havighurst Special Collections. He interviewed with Helen Ball, Frances McClure and Elizabeth Brice and was offered a paying job he would have gladly done for free.

Bricker’s entire Miami career was not spent in the special collections, though. He reached full-time status in 1988 by taking on an additional half-time role in interlibrary loan, which became full-time. A man of many hats throughout his life, Bricker later took on responsibilities at the information desk and in circulation, leaving him, at one point, trying to coordinate vacation between three different supervisors.

In 2005, Janet Stuckey, then head of special collections, encouraged him to apply for an opening back where his Miami career began. He finishes his career in that same position next month.

“I have this sense that I am blessed,” Bricker said. “There has not been a day since I came here when I didn’t want to get up and go to work. I get to look at Shakespeare folios and leafs from a Gutenberg Bible. And, it’s the people. Wherever I’ve worked here has been a fun environment.”

He has many favorite moments. During the Dalai Lama’s visit in 2010, he curated a special collections exhibit on Buddhism and still treasures a photo taken with him and a pair of visiting Buddhist monks. He also has thoroughly enjoyed working with and getting to know former NBC executive and Miami alumnus Rick Ludwin, who developed and advocated for Bricker’s favorite television show, Seinfeld.

Perhaps his greatest source of pride comes from the fact he has had the privilege of working for every Miami head of special collections, from Helen Ball to Bill Modrow.

When reflecting on his career in the Miami Libraries, Bricker recalls a defining moment in the early 1990s when he was taking library science classes and pondering his future.

“There was this moment where I realized what I really loved was just working in the library,” Bricker said. “I knew then that I had what I wanted, and anything else was going to complicate it. There’s a freedom to that. I’ve worked with the best people in the best place, and I’ve never regretted that.”

 

By: friedevt on: December 19, 2016 8:17 am | friedevt @ohiyote

By Vince Frieden, Strategic Communications Coordinator

Anyone looking for an engaging conversation can find a willing partner in Ken Grabach.

Grabach, who retires this month after 30 years in the Miami University Libraries, is a people person with an unquenchable curiosity, ranging from the natural world to international affairs and, of course, maps.

“I’m glad I don’t have to apply for continuing library borrowing privileges,” Grabach said. “I like to know at least a little about any topic. I love learning. I love reading. People are still going to see plenty of me around the Miami Libraries.”

The son of a protestant minister who moved frequently during his youth, Grabach considers his home Flint, Mich., where he attended high school and later the University of Michigan-Flint. After earning his master’s in library science from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, he served five years as a librarian for the U.S. Army before deciding he wanted to try the academic sector.

He arrived at the Miami Libraries 30 years ago in government documents and never left. He enjoyed his initial position, particularly when the Miami Libraries became a depository for the European Union, affording him opportunities to participate in conferences, including a week-long event in Brussels, Belgium.

But maps have long been a passion.

“I remember when I was eight years old our family got a world map,” Grabach said. “I would spread that map out on the living room floor and spend hours just looking at it or studying sections of it.”

He leapt at the chance to become the half-time maps librarian at Miami, a position that would later evolve to become full-time and to include liaison responsibilities with the departments of geography, geology and mathematics. To a man with collections of map ties and t-shirts, he was in his element.

“I’ve been getting paid to play with and buy maps,” Grabach said. “When we moved the Kuchler Vegetation Maps from Hughes to a welcoming home in special collections, I referred to them as ‘my children.’”

Supplementing that enjoyment are the many relationships he has formed with students and faculty. He recalls on Sept. 11, 2001, talking with one of his student workers, who arrived hours early for his shift just to talk to Grabach about the day’s happenings. He treasures those relationships and the opportunities he has had to touch lives.

“Moments like that are very personally rewarding,” Grabach said. “I wouldn’t have had those opportunities if I had not chosen academics. I’ve really enjoyed our students and faculty.”

The collective impact of Grabach’s work came full circle for him during his last Miami finals week.

In observing presentations from two student teams with whom he had worked closely on a client-based project, he shared pride in their hard work and saw the realized potential of his extensive efforts, along with those of Eric Johnson, to digitize much of Miami’s map collection. He also felt honored that one of his articles was cited in one of the presentations and appreciated that one of the closing slides thanked him and congratulated him on his retirement.

For Grabach, retirement with his wife, Patsy, and big, red cat, Clifford, will not mark a significant slowdown.

“I tell people that I’ll be able to sleep in until 7 a.m. now,” Grabach said. “I’m very excited about the Institute for Learning in Retirement and am already looking at a class in the spring. I also have a budding interest in photography. I still very much see myself as a student.”

 

By: friedevt on: December 16, 2016 2:11 pm | friedevt @ohiyote

Walter Havighurst Special Collections included in $2.3 million estate gift 

By Josh Chapin, assistant director editorial services, university advancement
View full story at ForLoveandHonor.org

OXFORD, Ohio — Miami University today announced an estate gift of more than $2.3 million to benefit both the Department of Geography and University Libraries. The gift will support the Walter Havighurst Special Collections housed at King Library, as well as enhance the teaching and research programs for the Department of Geography.

The gift was made by the late Ruth McConnell ’46, who graduated from Miami with a bachelor’s degree in literature and later obtained her master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin. She retired as an administrative assistant from Stanford University in 1985. The gift is part of the Wallace and Della McConnell Memorial Fund, established by Ruth to honor her parents. Wallace McConnell was the geography chair at Miami from 1946-52 and taught and researched at the university starting in 1918.

The Walter Havighurst Special Collections are named for a writer and professor of English at Miami from 1928-69. The Havighurst Special Collections preserve and make accessible volumes and documents covering a variety of subject areas and historical periods, ranging from rare collections of Russian history and English literature to the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma’s Myaamia Collection and an extensive postcard collection.

“The Walter Havighurst Special Collections and our archival collections are laboratories for the humanities, offering our students hands-on experiences with records and treasures from the past,” said Jerome Conley, dean and university librarian. “Ms. McConnell’s gift joins the support of a long line of alumni and friends whose generosity allows us to preserve and enhance these rare and important collections that advance the liberal arts and help inspire informed citizens and lifelong learners.”

By: friedevt on: December 09, 2016 11:25 am | friedevt @ohiyote

 

Thom Gerrish joined the Miami University Libraries team earlier this fall as Science and Engineering Librarian in B.E.S.T. Library. Learn more about Thom in our December staff spotlight.


Where are you originally from? What's your educational background?

I’m originally from near Kalamazoo, Mich.  I graduated from Michigan State University with undergrad degrees in biochemistry and Russian.  I also have a master’s in linguistics from MSU. My MLIS is from Wayne State University in Detroit, Mich. 


What's your title? How would you describe your position at the Miami Libraries?

My title is Science and Engineering Librarian.  This comes with a lot of different functions.  I’m essentially responsible for connecting with the students and faculty in chemistry, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, and geology departments.  This means providing research help, managing the library’s collection, and liaising with the departments.  


What drew you to work in a library environment? Why did you choose the Miami Libraries? 

Being a librarian means working with a lot of interesting people and learning a lot of different things.  Working at Miami means being at a great school that allows me to live in the Midwest near family and friends. 


What's the best part of working in a library?

Almost every day is different.  Some days you meet with students, others you work on collection development or personal research.  I love the variety that the job brings.


What's one thing you wish college students knew about using a library?

Probably inter library loan.  The library can get you nearly anything you need…but you might need to start your research earlier than the night before it’s due.  This is a powerful resource that I wish more people knew about and used.


What's your favorite book? What book character would you most like to be?

It’s hard to say what my favorite of all time would be. I really like The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov, The Stand by Stephen King, and the Wheel of Time Series by Robert Jordan.  As for a character from a book, I guess I’d like to be Tyrion Lannister from A Song of Ice and Fire for his combination of wit and sarcasm. 


Any hobbies?

I play trumpet and cornet.  I also enjoy cooking since it reminds me of being in a chemistry lab. 


What's something people don't know about you that might surprise them?

I used to have all the licenses required to sell securities like stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. 

By: crosbylm on: November 22, 2016 3:05 pm | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

 

Just in time to cozy up with a good book during Thanksgiving break, the Leisure Reading collection recently added fiction titles by prolific authors Jodi Picoult and Nicholas Sparks, as well as memoirs by well-known celebrities and public figures, including Lil Wayne, Bryan Cranston and Ruth Bador Ginsburg (what an eclectic group!). For a full list of what’s new in November, see our list below:  

 

Boy is Back by Meg Cabot

Gone ‘til November by Lil Wayne

Life in Parts by Bryan Cranston

My Own Words by Ruth Bador Ginsburg

Paris for One and Other Stories by Jojo Moyes

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

Today Will Be Different by Maria Semple

Two by Two by Nicholas Sparks

 
By: vonnahee on: November 18, 2016 9:57 am | vonnahee

"Libraries provide a safe place for individuals of all ages and backgrounds and for difficult discussions on social issues.  Our nation’s libraries serve all community members, including people of color, immigrants, people with disabilities, and the most vulnerable in our communities, offering services and educational resources that transform communities, open minds and promote inclusion and diversity."

Read the full statement here. 

By: weavered on: November 10, 2016 10:01 pm | weavered

Canadian poet and singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen passed away tonight at the age of 82. Cohen is perhaps best known for the song "Hallelujah," although you are more likely to have heard the cover versions by John Cale, Jeff Buckley, Rufus Wainwright, and many others. He is also the author of multiple novels and poetry collections. Much like David Bowie, Cohen recently released one last great album shortly before his death: You Want It Darker.

By: messnekr on: November 08, 2016 11:26 am | messnekr

Are you working on a job application or your promotion dossier, and need to demonstrate the impact your work has made? Don’t know the difference between an impact factor and an Eigenfactor? Not sure how to find out which journals in your field are "the best"? This workshop is for you! Workshop presenters will provide an overview of established and alternative methods for assessing the influence of published scholarship.

WHEN: Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 2:00 – 3:30PM
WHERE: Laws Hall 116 (B.E.S.T. Library)

This workshop is appropriate for faculty members and graduate students in all disciplines.  Participants will leave the workshop with an understanding of how to locate and calculate metrics for research impact, including Journal Impact Factors, h-index, Eigenfactor, social media-based metrics, and more. Participants will also gain an appreciation for the limitations of publication metrics and the varied suitability of different metrics for different academic fields and types of publications.

Please contact Kevin Messner at krmessner@miamioh.edu for more information or to RSVP.  We look forward to you joining us!