News & Notes

By: alfordem on: March 10, 2014 3:35 pm | alfordem

Sunday, March 16 is Freedom of Information Day.  This yearly celebration is always on or around the birthday of James Madison, who strongly believed in the freedom of information. The Freedom of Information Act, which was enacted in 1966, protects the rights that all American citizens have to federal knowledge.  For more information on this act, come check out Government Information’s Guide to the Freedom of Information Act or access it online. Access to this and many other materials are available to members of the Miami community through the Federal Depository Library Program. “Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.” –James Madison Happy Freedom of Information Day!

By: hartsea on: March 12, 2014 7:15 pm | hartsea

Miami University Libraries will be hosting its last Muslim Journeys* Book Discussion on April 17th from 4:00 to 5:00 in King 320. There will be a short presentation from a scholar, a discussion of the book, and light refreshments. Our scholar for this book will be Dr. Liz Wilson, Comparative Religion.

Our fifth book will be Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi.  You can find out more about this book and the other books we will be reading in our discussion series here.  Here are two primary documents to provide context for this work: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's Visit to a Harem and The Harem and the Revolutionary Gentlewomen of Egypt.  You might also find this map and timeline useful.

Her website is also worth checking out.  Plus we have a lot of her other books in our collection.

We encourage you to sign up for the book discussions so that you can receive free copies of the selected books. You can read more about our Muslim Journeys programming on the website.  

If you are interested in even more books to read, check out some of the books from our bookshelf: Bridging Cultures: Literary ReflectionsBridging Cultures: American Stories, and Bridging Cultures: Connected Histories.

*Our Muslim Journeys programming is sponsored by the American Library Association, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Miami University Humanities Center.  Additional support provided by the Miami University Center for American and World Cultures and the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati.

By: natalejj on: February 19, 2014 5:00 pm | natalejj

Miami University Libraries and the Howe Writing Center celebrate National Black History Month with the 25th Annual African American Read-In on Wednesday, February 26th. The Read-In encourages the celebration of all aspects of the African American experience, including the reading of selections from all literary genres, the display of artistic works, music and dance performances, and more! Come join us & share some of your own work or anything that recognizes the talent, contribution, or experience of African Americans. Refreshments will be provided so please pass the word & join us Wednesday, February 26th between 11:30am & 2:30pm, first floor King Library, Howe Writing Center for a multi-faceted Read-In!

For more information, registration, and if you’d like some ideas on things to read, please visit: http://libguides.lib.muohio.edu/diversity

Registration is not necessary, but highly encouraged. And as always, we welcome those who choose to come, listen, and enjoy.

By: resnisew on: March 14, 2014 1:26 pm | resnisew

Due to the power outages, this workshop has been rescheduled. There is plenty of time to register!

Do you know the difference between an impact factor and an Eigenfactor? Do you know how to find out which journals are considered the most influential in your field ? Do you know how much impact your research is having? To find out, come to the “Tools for Preparing Your Dossier" workshop designed for faculty and graduate students who want to learn more about the research impact tools available to them. We'll cover Web of Science (including JCR), Publish or Perish, Google Scholar Citations, and WorldCat Identities. We’ll also demonstrate emerging alternatives to the traditional metrics tools such as ImpactStory and article level metrics.
The workshops are designed for all disciplines. The first workshop will cover science and social science disciplines. The second workshop will cover the humanities. Interdisciplinary researchers will benefit from either. Attend one or both!

Where: King 110
When: NEW DATE: April 2
Workshop One (Sciences/Social Sciences): 2:30pm – 3:30pm
Workshop Two (Humanities) 4:00pm – 5:00pm

For more information: http://libguides.lib.miamioh.edu/dossier
Register here: http://goo.gl/71KUMy

By: weavered on: February 19, 2014 1:56 pm | weavered

Amos Music Library has established a new collection of general interest CD recordings. These selections range from classical to pop, musicals, folk / blues, and jazz. The Spotlight Collection is prominently displayed and designed for casual browsing. Some titles are temporarily included because of current events or local performances.

The Spotlight Collection titles serve as a sample of our collection of almost 20,000 recordings on CD and vinyl located in our closed stacks. Come by CPA to see our selections or borrow any of our titles.

By: hartsea on: February 17, 2014 10:16 am | hartsea

Miami University Libraries will be hosting its fourth Muslim Journeys* Book Discussion on March 6th from 4:00 to 5:00 in King 320. There will be a short presentation from a scholar, a discussion of the book, and light refreshments. Our scholar for this book will be Dr. Fauzia Ahmed, Sociology and Women's & Gender Studies.

Our fourth book will be Broken Verses by Kamila Shamsie.  You can find out more about this book and the other books we will be reading in our discussion series here.  Here is a review you might useful. These resources will also be useful: an interview, a map, and a timeline. You might also find this recent online discussion Kamila Shamsie had with the author Pankaj Mishra interesting.

We encourage you to sign up for the book discussions so that you can receive free copies of the selected books. You can read more about our Muslim Journeys programming on the website.

If you are interested in even more books to read, check out some of the books from our bookshelf: Bridging Cultures: Literary Reflections, Bridging Cultures: American Stories, and Bridging Cultures: Connected Histories.

*Our Muslim Journeys programming is sponsored by the American Library Association, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Miami University Humanities Center.  Additional support provided by the Miami University Center for American and World Cultures and the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati.

By: tullykk on: February 24, 2014 3:08 pm | tullykk

Whenever we can, we like to plan our exhibits to align with university-wide thematic programming.  Last year's Summer Reading Program selection, Jane McGonigal's Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World,  inspired many games and gaming-themed events across campus, including the Libraries' very successful International Games Day celebration last semester.  This year's gaming theme provided a perfect opportunity to highlight a subset of our Edgar W. and Faith King Collection of Juvenile Literature: historical games and books about recreational games.  Putting together an exhibit on any topic is an opportunity for me to delve deeper into the collections, to find "new" treasures, and to think about new ways that the material can be used in their current exhibit context and in the future for research and/or instruction.

In doing research about the history of board and table games in the West to provide context and provide interesting label content for the physical exhibit, I discovered that our collection contains some wonderful examples of how the mass production of games changed over the course of the nineteenth century in England and the United States.  From the simple, but elegant, hand-colored educational board games published by specialized printing shops in England at the end of the eighteenth century to the mass-produced and attractively packaged games produced by giants of the gaming industry, like Milton Bradley, McLoughlin Bros., and Parker Bros., we have some great representative pieces.  It's been great learning about the origins of modern board and card games and the "golden age" of game production.

Figuring out how to display the board and card games in the physical exhibit cases in an appealing way, while being conscious of preservation concerns, was also a  great takeaway from this exhibit for me and my colleague, our Preservation Librarian Ashley Jones.  Ashley wrote about this in last week's blog and it's an interesting look behind the scenes of the exhibit process.  We're also trying new things to make a visit to our exhibit gallery a more interactive experience, with the addition of an iPad kiosk equipped with a gaming app and coming soon: two playable "recreations" of board games circa 1800.

A brief description of the exhibit: Due to advances in manufacturing and printing technologies and an expanding middle class with more leisure time, the mass production of board, table and card games exploded in the 19th century. This exhibit traces the origins of today’s gaming industry, highlighting the products of the golden age of commercial game production in the United Kingdom, the United States, and beyond from the 1790s to the 1920s. Highlights of the exhibit include several hand-colored board games from England circa 1800, early games and puzzles produced by leading American game manufacturers, Milton Bradley, the McLoughlin Brothers, and the Parker Brothers, and an early French version of the popular magnetic fish pond game.

A reception, free and open to the public, will be held on March 12 from 4:00 – 6:00 PM and will include a talk on games and gaming by Sarah Fay Krom, Visiting Assistant Professor in the Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies, and a gallery talk by Special Collections Librarian and curator of the exhibit, Kimberly Tully.

Do stop by this semester and see some fascinating games from the past!

Kimberly Tully
Special Collections Librarian

 

 

By: hartsea on: February 10, 2014 12:39 pm | hartsea

Stuart Hall, a well-known sociologist and cultural theorist, has died. You can read more about his death and life here, here, and here.  Also here is a recent interview.

We have many of his publications at the library.  The Popular Arts is a good place to start.  You can also find a list of many of his important works when you do a search in the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory & Criticism.  His work influences scholars in a variety of fields, including English and Sociology, so you will find articles written by him and about him in several different databases, such as the Modern Language Association Bibliography and SocINDEX with Full Text.

You might also be interested in reading issues of New Left Review since he was one of the founders.

By: natalejj on: February 03, 2014 1:43 pm | natalejj

When searching for items in the Miami University Libraries catalog, you might find
an item that is available at “SW Depository”. Have you ever wondered what that
was? It is the Southwest Ohio Regional Depository, affectionately known as SWORD.
There are 5 regional depositories in Ohio whose holdings are shared across
academic libraries in the state. SWORD is shared by Miami University, Central State
University, University of Cincinnati, and Wright State University and is located
on the Miami Middletown Campus. Miami University Libraries are continuously
purchasing new items to add to their collections in order to provide the best
possible resources for our students, faculty and staff. Less used items are moved to
SWORD to make room for the more frequently used items. Books requested from
SWORD typically arrive in 2-3 business days and requested journal articles are
received electronically. Miami has over 1 million items in the depository!

A view from inside SWORD shows towering shelves of books reaching 3-1/2 stories
high and 7-1/2 stories long. Books are stored by size and then are barcoded.
Barcodes are stored in the catalog system so items can be retrieved by staff who run a cherry picker down the aisles and up the 3-1/2 story high stacks. The dedicated staff who work in SWORD certainly don’t have a fear of heights!

By: hartsea on: February 17, 2014 9:59 am | hartsea

Miami University Libraries will be hosting its third Muslim Journeys* Book Discussion on February 13th from 4:00 to 5:00 in King 320.  There will be a short presentation from a scholar, a discussion of the book, and light refreshments.  Our scholar for this book will be Dr. Matthew Gordon, professor of History.

Our third book will be House of Stone by Anthony Shadid.  You can find out more about this book and the other books we will be reading in our discussion series here. Here's a book review for the book.  You might also be interested in a series of 10 videos of Anthony Shadid, as he completes the renovations on his ancestral home.  Finally you can read an obituary for Anthony Shadid here.

We encourage you to sign up for the book discussions so that you can receive free copies of the selected books. You can read more about our Muslim Journeys programming on the website.

If you are interested in even more books to read, check out some of the books from our bookshelf: Bridging Cultures: Literary ReflectionsBridging Cultures: American Stories, and Bridging Cultures: Connected Histories.

*Our Muslim Journeys programming is sponsored by the American Library Association, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Miami University Humanities Center.  Additional support provided by the Miami University Center for American and World Cultures and the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati.