News & Notes

By: natalejj on: November 03, 2014 2:18 pm | natalejj

November is designated by the United States Government as Native American Heritage Month.  There is a rich history of Native American culture here at Miami University. Gain an understanding of the history of the Myaamia community and learn more about the Miami Tribe whom Miami University is named after by exploring our digital collections. Challenge yourself this month to learn about Native American culture by reading materials by or about Native Americans.  The Libraries has put together a list of resources to get you started so check it out today!

http://libguides.lib.miamioh.edu/diversity/nativeamerican

By: micheljp on: October 31, 2014 1:48 pm | micheljp @jpmichel

There's nothing like a good scare. Put yourself in a creeped-out mood with one of these hair-raising short stories.

  Ray Bradbury's "Veldt" from The Illustrated Man

 

 

 

 

 

  Rajesh Parameswaran's "The Infamous Bengal Ming" from I am an Executioner.

 

 

 

 

 

 Joyce Carol Oates's "Where are you Going, Where Have You Been?"

 

 

 

 

 

 Vladimir Nabokov's "Terra Incognita"

 

 

 

 

 

 Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"

 

 

 

 

 

We have hundreds more horrific and scary stories and novels in our collection.  Get spooked this weekend!

By: hartsea on: October 27, 2014 9:25 am | hartsea

Since the General Election is next week on November 4th, I thought you might enjoy reading up on politics.  We've got some great memoirs, biographies, political essays, and other non-fiction works for you to check out:

One Nation: What We Can All Do To Save America's Future by Ben Carson

HRC: State Secrets and the Rebirth of Hillary Clinton by Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes

Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty

Hard Choices by Hillary Rodham Clinton

The First Family Detail: Secret Service Agents Reveal the Hidden Lives of the Presidents by Ronald Kessler

Enough: Our Fight to Keep American Safe from Gun Violence by Gabrielle Giffords

​Forgetting To Be Afraid: A Memoir by Wendy Davis

 

By: wallerjl on: October 23, 2014 10:15 am | wallerjl

 

Have you done work you’re proud of?

Do you want to share it so that others can read and build upon it?

Institutional repositories are widely used as to make scholarship freely accessible on the Web. The Scholarly Commons is Miami University’s institutional repository, and students are now eligible to deposit their work there. Share your work with the world, and reap the rewards of an open system of scholarship!
 

Familiarize yourself with Miami’s Scholarly Commons!
The Scholarly Commons makes research available to a wider audience, and it is administered by the Miami University Libraries to help ensure its long-term preservation. Familiarize yourself by visiting the Scholarly Commons at http://sc.lib.miamioh.edu, and then browse the F.A.Q. at http://sc.lib.miamioh.edu/FAQ.html. The Scholarly Commons is open to any Miami University faculty member, student, department, lab, research unit, or staff member. Submission is easy, and the Scholarly Commons accepts many different kinds of files. Anyone with access to the Internet and a web browser can search, view, and download items from the Scholarly Commons.
 

If you're an undergraduate student, talk with your professors about sponsoring your work!
Undergraduate work submitted to the Scholarly Commons requires a faculty sponsor. The sponsor should be the professor who is most familiar with the work you would like to submit and who can vouch for its originality and quality. Your professors will be happy to help you get your work out there, and the process is easy. So ask a professor today! Your work will help increase Miami University’s visibility, prestige, and public value. Even better, it will help you by providing a place where you can showcase your work!
 

Understand why institutional repositories such as the Scholarly Commons are important!
View a 3 ½ minute video about institutional repositories on YouTube to better understand how institutional repositories work and why they’re important. This short video is from James Neal at Columbia University, and the same concepts apply to Miami’s Scholarly Commons. Just go to http://youtu.be/Ang4XnG3n6Q.

 

Follow the conversations on Twitter!
Follow @miamiuoa, @miamiulibraries, @R2RC, and @SPARC_NA to keep up with ongoing developments about open access and institutional repositories. #oaweek

 
Image credit: 2008-01-26 (Editing a paper) - 19 © Nic McPhee. Used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license. 
By: weavered on: October 22, 2014 6:28 pm | weavered

The Infinite Symphony

We've added new music to our Spotify playlist, including pieces by Shostakovich, Strauss, Bruckner, Vaughan Williams, Franck, and more. There are now 80 pieces and over 70 hours of music. Listen here: The Infinite Symphony

If you need a Spotify account, click here: https://www.spotify.com/us/signup/

Happy listening!

By: revellaa on: October 22, 2014 4:43 pm | revellaa

Have you ever tried to read an article, only to be asked to pay? 

Being unable to access an article is called “hitting a paywall.” Paywalls hide knowledge and stifle innovation.  Libraries help by subscribing to journals and magazines,  but no single university can afford to subscribe to everything published.  Open access materials can help alleviate students hitting these paywalls.

 

What can I do to help remove paywalls that act as barriers to research?

  • Use the Open Access Button: The Open Access Button lests users track when they are denied access to research. By clicking the button in your bookmarks bar, the Open Access Button will help you get the research you want and add papers you still need to your wishlists. Download the bookmarklet, the free mobile app, or the free web app at http://www.openaccessbutton.org.
  • Learn more about the problem: Visit the Right to Resarch coalition's website at http://www.righttoresearch.org. There you can get up to speed on everything fromt he challenges students face to the impact of limited and how we can solve the problem. Sign the Student Statement on the Right to Research and find ideas to take action on as an individual or as a group. Get your organizations, student government, and friends on board. There is strength in numbers.
  • Encourage your professors to make their own work open: As students, you have a crucial role in making Open Access a reality because you know firsthand that you're expected to cite articles from scholarly journals when you write papers. The open access issue is a complicated one for some professors, but they may be encouraged to hear students asking questions about open access. Students - who read, rely on, and write for scholarly publications - have the power to change the way research is exchanged.
  • Follow the conversations on Twitter at #oaweek@miamiuoa, @miamiulibraries, @R2RC and @SPARC_NA to keep up with the ongoing developments about open access

 

 

By: bazelejw on: October 21, 2014 10:19 am | bazelejw @@jwbazeley

What are Open Educational Resources (OER)?

They’re teaching, learning, and research resources released under an open license that permits their free use and repurposing by others. OER can be textbooks, courses, lessons plans, videos, software, lab notebooks, or any other material that supports access to knowledge.

Why are they important?

Traditional print textbook costs have risen at triple the rate of inflation over the last ten years, even though technology has created new opportunities to bring these costs down. Students often end up paying more than $1,000 a year for textbooks that are used only for one course and become outdated quickly. OER are an alternative to traditional textbooks that can help to lower student costs for higher education.

How can undergraduates support the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) at Miami University?

Ask your professors about using OER in the courses you are enrolled in!

Visit the Creative Commons Education web page at http://creativecommons.org/education. There you can watch videos, read case studies, and get up to speed on ways we can solve the problem. The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) also maintains a web page with extensive information and resources about OER at http://www.sparc.arl.org/issues/oer.

Get involved with OhioPIRG Students

Ohio Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) Students is an independent, statewide student organization that works on many issues of concern to students, including the high cost of textbooks. At the OhioPIRG Students’ website at http://ohiopirgstudents.org/ you can get involved in making textbooks more affordable by signing the Textbook Rebellion Petition (http://ohiopirgstudents.org/campaigns/oh/make-textbooks-affordable) or even starting a PIRG chapter on Miami’s campus.

Get involved in Open Education Week

With support from CELTUA and the Miami University Libraries, a group of 16 Miami faculty members, students, staff, and librarians have been exploring issues surrounding OER. Open Education Week takes place March 9 – 13, 2015, and the group is looking for students to help make the week a success. Kirsten Fowler serves both as ASG  Secretary for Academic Affairs and as a member of the group exploring OER. To get started, email Kirsten about your interest at fowlerkk@miamioh.edu.

Follow the conversations on Twitter

Follow @miamiuoa, @miamiulibraries, @R2RC, and @SPARC_NA to keep up with ongoing developments about open access and OER. #oaweek

 
By: revellaa on: October 20, 2014 10:03 am | revellaa

Generation Open LogoAre you Generation Open?

Are you tired of hitting paywalls when you're doing research? 
Are you frustrated with the high price of textbooks? 
Do you want to share your work openly with others across the world? 


If so, then YOU are Generation Open. Join the Miami University Libraries and institutions around the world as we celebrate Open Access Week from October 20th through October 26th. Stop by the "Generation Open" table to talk about the issues and learn how you can help create a more open system of scholarship.

Monday, October 20th, 10am – 5pm: Armstrong Student Center

Tuesday, October 21st, 10am – 4pm: Bell Tower

Wednesday, October 22, 10am – 4pm: Armstrong Student Center

Thursday, October 23, 10am – 4pm: King Café

For more information see http://bit.ly/MUOAWeek or talk to any librarian. And follow the conversation on Twitter at #oaweek. Follow @miamiuoa@miamiulibraries@R2RC, and@SPARC_NA to keep up with ongoing developments about open access. Also, watch this blog all week for additional posts relating to open access.

By: crosbylm on: October 19, 2014 12:08 pm | crosbylm

Couldn't make it to the inaugural book club meeting? No problem! Sign up to attend our second meeting of the year, November 11 from 6-7:30 pm: http://tinyurl.com/Q9DYMJW This time around, in keeping with the YA theme, we’re reading The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. 
 
Inspired by The Prestige by Christopher Priest and Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrel by Susanna Clarke, and beginning as a National Novel Writing Month Project for Morgenstern, The Night Circus chronicles Le Cirque des Rêves, an awe-inspiring circus that is only open at night, and a competition between its two dueling young magicians, Celia and Marco. Celia and Marco soon find themselves falling in love – but, unbeknownst to them both, this is a dangerous game in which only one can be left standing. Lovers of fantasy, magic and romance will enjoy this award winning bestseller and debut novel! 
 
Register to attend at http://tinyurl.com/Q9DYMJW. A limited number of free copies of the book are available, and refreshments will be provided! 
 
We hope to see you there!
 
 
Join our Goodreads.com group and continue the conversation at https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/145115-second-year-book-club
 
This event is cosponsored by the University Libraries, Second Year Programs, and the Family Fund. 
 
By: micheljp on: October 13, 2014 10:56 am | micheljp @jpmichel

Beginning in 2014, we are working to preserve not only a record of the materials displayed in our exhibits but also the narrative and story that is built from our collections in each exhibit. With the help of the University Libraries’ Emerging Technologies Cluster, we have recreated the ‘feel’ of each exhibit in a digital storytelling platform modeled on the New York Times’ Snow Fall project. These sites present a record of each exhibit in a dynamic, media-rich format.

Stories of Freedom Summer: From the Western College Memorial Archives: When the administration of the Western College for Women, now a part of Miami University, opened its campus to civil rights activists in 1964, an estimated 700 young and idealistic college students from across the north arrived in Oxford, Ohio for voter registration training. The exhibit centered around the experiences of three volunteers. The exhibit ran August 25 – December 12, 2014. Learn more about the exhibit here.


Covington’s Cincinnati: Samuel F. Covington was an Indiana native who built a successful career in the crowded Cincinnati insurance industry during the second half of the 1800’s. His experiences and those of his family typify the growing middle class that evolved in industrial America. The exhibit ran June 4 – August 1, 2014. Learn more about the exhibit here.


Cradle of Coaches: A Legacy of Excellence: Miami University has a long and proud tradition of producing exceptional coaches. In 1959, Bob Kurz (Class of 1958) coined the term the ‘Cradle of Coaches’ in reference to the many star football coaches to have passed through Miami University. The exhibit ran August 19 – December 13, 2013. Learn more about the exhibit here.