News & Notes

By: natalejj on: October 02, 2014 11:42 am | natalejj

This year is the 50th Anniversary of Freedom Summer and the Miami community has come together to learn about and reflect on the events in 1964 that began here in Oxford, Ohio. The Libraries is proud to sponsor the Freedom Summer Conference as well as share our collections in an effort to gain an appreciation for our local connection to an important time in the civil rights movement.

Members of the Miami and Oxford communities have a unique opportunity to participate in the Freedom Summer Conference taking place October 11-14.  The opening session will be moderated by Jerome Conley, Miami University Dean of Libraries. The discussion includes many tremendous speakers who will share their experience and insight into the civil rights movement. Join us as we honor the bravery and sacrifice of the Freedom Summer volunteers and learn how we can continue to advocate for the rights and freedoms of all people.

For the complete conference schedule and to register, go to:

http://westernarchives.lib.miamioh.edu/freedomsummer/conference/

For information about our Freedom Summer collections, go to:

http://libguides.lib.miamioh.edu/FreedomSummer

 

Opening Session: Monday, October 13, 9-10:30 a.m.

Marcum Center 180-186

“Understanding the Past, Building the Future”, with Raymond F. Gorman, Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, introducing a conversation between contemporary civil rights activists about the role of the civil rights movement in past and present.

Moderator: Jerome Conley, Miami University Dean of Libraries.

Panelists: Charles Cobb, Brown University; Sylvia Golbin Goodman, The Andrew

Goodman Foundation; David Goodman, The Andrew Goodman Foundation; Tom

Dutton, Miami University; Gloria Wade Gayles, Spelman College; Rev. Clifton

Kilpatrick, community organizer and pastor, Zanesville, Ohio; Hanan Sabea, The

American University in Cairo.

 
By: hartsea on: September 22, 2014 9:15 am | hartsea

This year's Banned Books Week will take place between September 21st and September 27th. You can find out about some of the events planned around the country and get helpful information at the Banned Books Week website.  This year's theme is comics.  You can find out more about banned and challenged comics at the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund website.  You might also be interested in a recent New York Times article, this blog post, and this interesting storify collection of a twitter chat.

King Library is marking this week with a display on the first floor of King in the foyer of the library. We also have a lot of great resources to help you explore this issue.

We have several books and resources about the censorship of comics that took place in the 1950's:

The ten-cent plague: the great comic-book scare and how it changed America by David Hajdu. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6725 .H33 2008

Seal of approval: the history of the comics code by Amy Kiste Nyberg. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6725 .N953 1998

Pulp demons: international dimensions of the postwar anti-comics campaign edited by John A. Lent.  King Library (2nd floor) | PN6710 .P85 1999

Of comics and men : a cultural history of American comic books by Jean-Paul Gabilliet. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6725 .G3313 2010

The horror! the horror! : comic books the government didn't want you to read!  edited by Jim Trombetta, with an introduction by R. L. Stine.  Available by request through OhioLINK.

Seduction of the innocent by Frederic Wertham.  Access through Alexander Street Press.

Interim Report of the Committee on the Judiciary pursuant to S. Res. 89 (83d Cong. 1st sess.) and S. Res. 190 (83d Cong. 2d sess.) a part of the investigation of juvenile delinquency in the United States. Alternate title: Comic books and juvenile delinquency.  Original report from 1955 available as a pdf.

We also have access to a database called Underground and Independent Comics, Comix, and Graphic Novels, which features the comics that went "underground" after the Comics Code Authority was put in place.

Though the Comics Code Authority and the censorship that happened as a result is a thing of the past, many comics are still being challenged, including recent challenges to Persepolis in Chicago and Seattle.  Cases have included: 

Blankets by Craig Thompson. ArtArch Graphic Novels | PN6727.T48 B58 2003

Bone by Jeff Smith. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6727.S546 B66 2004

Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore.  ArtArch Graphic Novels | PN6728.B36 M66 2008

Fun home: a family tragicomic by Alison Bechdel. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6727.B3757 Z46 2006

Ice Haven by Daniel Clowes. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6727.C565 I33 2005

In the night kitchen by Maurice Sendak. King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv Easy | PZ7.S47 In

Maus: a survivor's tale by Art Spiegelman. King Library (2nd floor) | D804.3 .S66 1986

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6747.S245 P4713 2003.  

Pride of Baghdad by Brian K. Vaughan. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6727.V38 P75 2006

Stuck Rubber Baby by Howard Cruse. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6727.C74 S86 1995

The Color of Earth by Kim Dong Hwa. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6790.K63 K5513 2009

Watchmen by Alan Moore. King Folio | PN6737.M6 W38 2005

Barefoot Gen by Keiji Nakazawa. King Library (2nd floor) | PN6790.J33 N3313 2003

You can learn about the background of these cases here.

You can also find out more about comics and graphic novels on our subject guide on the topic.

By: gundyj on: September 18, 2014 3:49 pm | gundyj

Today is Constitution Day.  Constitution Day is a Federal holiday meant to celebrate and educate about the United States Constitution in schools across the country.

The Constitution of the United States is a living document that has been amended and interpreted throughout the history of the nation.  An interesting resource for the study of the interpretation of the Constitution is Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation.  The Constitution Annotated as it is commonly referred to is an overview of the Constitution through US Supreme Court decisions which outlines how the document has been interpreted throughout history.  Updated versions are published yearly by the Senate and can be found in King Library, or online through Congress.gov.  Historic version can be found in King and online at FDsys.gov

By: natalejj on: September 15, 2014 2:42 pm | natalejj

Today is the start of Hispanic Heritage Month and is a time to celebrate the accomplishments, heritage and culture of Hispanics.  September 15th is the anniversary of the independence of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua in 1821, and followed shortly thereafter by Mexico, Chile and Belize. If you would like to learn more about Hispanic Heritage Month, see this site by the Library of Congress.

We honor these Hispanic authors whose works are in the Miami University Libraries' collection.  Choose an author you haven't read and add them to your reading list!

Isabel Allende

Julia Alvarez

Jorge Luis Borges

Sandra Cisneros

Paul Coelho

Julio Cortazar

Junot Diaz

Carlos Fuentes

Mario Vargas Llosa

Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Esmeralda Santiago

 

 

 

By: hartsea on: August 25, 2014 3:27 pm | hartsea

Stop into King Café and browse our NEW Leisure Reading collection! Updated monthly, we keep the titles in this collection fresh and up to date. These are the hot, new releases and bestsellers you've been dying to get your hands on! From thrillers to cookbooks, on-trend nonfiction to the latest big screen adaptation, we have something for everyone.

Books in the Leisure Reading collection check out for 3 weeks. When you find a title you want, you can check the books out at the Instruction Materials Center (IMC) desk, on the ground floor of King. 

You will find a variety of titles for a variety of moods:

Curl up with a light mystery on a rainy afternoon, like Beach Bags and Burglaries by Dorothy Howell  

Dish the dirt with a celebrity book, such as Aviva Drescher's Leggy Blonde

Impress your friends by reading an important current events book, like Capital in the 21st Century by Thomas Picketty

​Get ready for the first lecture in Miami University Lecture Series by reading Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman.

You can find a list in our catalog here, or you can check out our pinterest board.

If that's not enough for you, there are also popular magazines you can browse while drinking your coffee in the cafe.  Happy reading!

By: natalejj on: August 20, 2014 4:14 pm | natalejj

Do you want to learn more about Freedom Summer and the Civil Rights Movement?  Keep the conversation going!  Miami University Libraries offers a wealth of resources from books and digital collections to video and audio items.  These resources have been compiled in one place for your convenience.  Contact any librarian if you need assistance in locating these items!

 

http://libguides.lib.miamioh.edu/FreedomSummer

By: micheljp on: August 19, 2014 11:07 am | micheljp @jpmichel

The Miami University Libraries is excited to provide users on the Oxford campus with full access to NYTimes.com and the NYTimes.com smartphone apps.* Of course, the Libraries also provides digital access to hundreds of other national and international newspapers including the Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Financial Times and more!

New Users: How to Activate a Pass

While physically on campus and within your school’s network:

  1. Go to nytimes.com/grouppass.
  2. Create an NYTimes.com account using your school email address. If you already have an NYTimes.com account using your school email address, you may log in with those credentials.
  3. When you see START YOUR ACCESS, the expiration time and date of your pass will appear.
  4. Go to NYTimes.com and enjoy your full access from any location!

Read more about this exciting program!

By: root on: August 11, 2014 10:10 pm | root


Check back soon for more information about this exciting new facility in King Library.

Related links:
- Miami to form office of research for undergraduates
- Joseph Johnson named first director of office of research for undergraduates


By: laddmm on: June 11, 2014 7:41 am | laddmm

Please note that, as of June 1st, the URL of the Bowden Postcard Collection Online is http://digital.lib.MiamiOH.edu/postcards.

It's been about a year since the project first began, so I thought now would be a good time to review the latest updates to the Bowden Postcard Collection Online. As I wrote about in November, this digital collection is being developed from the donation of roughly 480,000 postcards by two friends and Miami alumni: Clyde N. Bowden and Charles Shields. The project began last summer with a pilot that used a handful of cards from each state in Bowden's collection. These cards were digitized, given metadata records, and added to CONTENTdm - our digital content management system.

One of the Oxford, Ohio, postcards being pulled from the cabinet.
One of the Oxford, Ohio, postcards being pulled from the cabinet.

In the year since we began, we have digitized nearly 2,200 postcards, mostly from Ohio. There have been some setbacks along the way, most notably the recognition in December for a need to revise our already existing metadata records. At the same time, however, we have also made great strides forward. Clyde N. Bowden, the donor and namesake, was very excited to hear about the project and has given us a very generous donation to fund the current Ohio-focused work. His was not the only positive feedback we have had, either. Since joining the Commons, our digital collections' Flickr account - of which the postcards represent a substantial portion - has averaged between 10-20,000 views a day, and the number of monthly hits we have received in CONTENTdm for the full collection has likewise increased several times over. One particularly memorable response was from someone who recognized his father in a photograph used for one of the Oxford postcards.

The work of creating card numbers and sorting the cards in the Shields collection was made significantly easier thanks to his labels.
The work of creating card numbers and sorting the cards in the Shields collection was made significantly easier thanks to his labels.

In addition to his financial contribution, Mr. Bowden also donated to us several boxes of books about postcards, books of postcards, and other postcard-related miscellanea. We are also receiving another generous donation from the Columbus Metropolitan Library in the form of roughly 500 postcards from their own collection - many of them being from the mid-20th century Middle East.

So where do we go from here? Thanks to Mr. Bowden's donation, we are able to investigate commercial digitization which will save a significant portion of our students' time and labor, allowing them to focus on creating the metadata records and adding them to the collection online. We also are expanding our operation and bringing on a third student this summer to help with the work. With the digitization outsourced and the extra help, I am anticipating having over 5,000 postcards online by the end of 2014. Once we have completed the roughly 8,000 postcards remaining in the Bowden collection, we will add the Ohio postcards from the Shields collection. My goal for the project is to complete both collections' Ohio cards - about 15,000 in total! - by the end of spring 2016. I have also created a Twitter account - @bowdenpostcards - to track new postcards being added to the collection. Although currently inactive for the summer break, I look forward to seeing the account continue to log the latest additions to the collection, including a fascinating postcard flipbook from early 1900's Portsmouth, Ohio (watch a video of it on the Special Collections blog here).

Finally, as part of the aforementioned metadata revisions, we have narrowed the geographic location of each card - sometimes even to a specific street or building! Using this new information, we are developing a map to visualize the data in the collection. The map will be created using the Leaflet JavaScript Library, as well as some homegrown PHP and MySQL. In order to gather the necessary information from the CONTENTdm database, I wrote a script that queries the API for information about each item. This information is then pushed to a SQL database on one of our library's server - and in turn will be used to populate the map. The script itself is set to run on a weekly basis to continually update the SQL database. By preloading all the responses from the API, we are able to significantly reduce the time required to load the map. I am hoping to deploy the map by the end of June, so keep an eye on the collection!

Proof of concept for postcard map
Proof of concept for postcard map

Happy browsing.

Marcus Ladd
Special Collections Librarian & Postcard Czar

By: hartsea on: May 28, 2014 11:37 am | hartsea

Angelou Poet and political activist Maya Angelou died today (May 28th).  You can read obituaries and commemorations here, here, and here.  You might also enjoy this collection of some of her best quotes (warning: video will play automatically).  I also think this NPR profile from 2008 will be useful in understanding her impact on society.

You may also want to read some of her works for yourself:

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. King Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 Z466 1970 

The Complete Collected Poems of Maya AngelouKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 A17 1994

And Still I RiseKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 A8

Mom & Me & MomKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 Z46 2013

On the Pulse of MorningKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 O53 1993

Phenomenal Woman: Four Poems Celebrating WomenKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 P48 1994

Celebrations: Rituals of Peace and PrayerKing Library (2nd floor) | PS3551.N464 C45 2006

"Nothing can dim the light which shines from within."