News & Notes

By: bomholmm on: August 27, 2013 4:19 pm | bomholmm

Google has released a native Windows Print Driver giving users access to cloud printing from desktop apps like Microsoft Word on their Windows PCs.

The cloud print driver will be available on all library PCs.

By: bomholmm on: July 23, 2013 2:29 pm | bomholmm

Miami University Libraries are now available in Google Indoor Maps. King Library,  Werts Art & Architecture Library, Music Library, Best Library(coming soon).

Indoor maps are best viewed in Google maps for Android or iOS(latest update).

By: bomholmm on: August 27, 2013 4:26 pm | bomholmm

Seamlessly print from your own devices with Google Cloud Print. The Miami University Libraries Google Cloud Printing service is now available. Simply click one of the links below to use our public printers with your Google account on any device that runs Google Chrome(PC/MAC/ANDROID/iOS).

King Printers

Best Printers

Music Printers

Art and Architecture Printers

More info on Google Cloud Printing

By: micheljp on: June 20, 2013 11:11 am | micheljp @jpmichel

We are happy to announce that we are currently in the midst of a trial of a new innovative iPad app titled Browzine. Go to the App Store and download it now for free and log in via your Miami University credentials. It allows Miami University students and faculty to:

  1. Easily read complete scholarly journals in a format that is optimized for tablet devices
  2. Create a personal bookshelf of favorite journals
  3. Be alerted when new editions of journals are published
  4. Easily save to Zotero, Mendeley, Dropbox and other services

This is a very slick new product. Take a look and let us know what you think! Email Jason Michel @ with questions and comments.

By: laddmm on: August 27, 2014 11:30 am | laddmm

Show Me The Awesome: 30 Days of Self-Promotion is an initiative by Sophie Brookover, Liz Burns, and Kelly Jensen to encourage librarian bloggers to think and talk about self-promotion. You can follow the series with the tag #30awesome on Twitter, Tumblr, Vine, and Instagram
As part of “Show Me The Awesome”, I want to step away from our usual fare and talk instead about the challenges of establishing a voice for yourself and your library in new settings. Being the newest member of our library staff, self-promotion for me is as much showing my worth to my peers as to our patrons. My challenge is to promote myself in a way that convinces my new coworkers to make room for me and my work. In parallel to establishing my voice here, I am also working to find a voice for our library in online communities. Much like being a new hire to the department, joining a social media community requires a degree of self-promotion to show that you are able to contribute to the conversation. One of the key elements to a successful social media presence for an institution is a feeling of personability; social media should not be treated as a bullhorn for attention, but rather as an opportunity to build connections. Consequently, it is important for the library to feel like an individual when engaging other users, and I cannot help but see an association between finding my voice among my new peers and finding the library’s voice online.
As with any new setting – physical or digital – the first (and often hardest!) step to making your voice heard is joining the conversation. It can be intimidating to enter a workplace community and show you can make valuable contributions, but some of the best advice I’ve been given about starting a new job was ‘remember that they hired you because you have something they’re missing’; the first hurdle to promoting your abilities is passed. However, when it comes to social media, there is no careful hiring process for quality control; for better or for worse, the Internet gives everyone a chance to make their voice heard. So how can a library promote itself and promise valuable contributions to online conversations?
Like the newcomer to the staff, the first step is knowing what your library has to offer that’s been lacking. By their nature, special collections libraries like mine have many things that are rare, unique, or even uncataloged – but by that same nature these are not materials that can leave the library. Developing a social media presence where awareness of these materials can be shared and gain popularity is a great opportunity to promote the library.
However, there is also a temptation to focus too much on showing off what you or your library has to offer. An early mistake I made in promoting the library with social media was relying on one-directional communication. Tumblr, a platform the university libraries had not previously engaged, was my first solo social media effort. Tumblarians – as the librarians, library students, and sundry bibliophiles on Tumblr call themselves – are a diverse group who welcomed me and the special collections blog warmly on my initial appearance. With some assistance from the excellent and helpful ex-tabulis, we got on a few lists of library blogs, and soon had a few dozen followers. But it wasn’t long until that number slipped. My mistake? I was talking too much and listening too little. I was researching what people were talking about and contributing from our collection, but that isn’t a conversation. As important as it is to show your own talents, part of promoting yourself is also showing that you are someone that can build connections and relationships.
At many libraries, the in-person interview process will involve lunches, coffee breaks, or other similar gatherings. While it might be a nice change after hours of presentations and questions, these ‘social interviews’ are every bit as important as the demonstration of your professional qualities. Libraries are collaborative environments and those social events demonstrate how you would fit in to the workplace community – do you seem to be someone they could write papers with, travel to conferences with, see every weekday for the next ten years? Similarly, social media users’ evaluation of your library and blog will not be based solely on your ability to formally present information, but their ability to feel some sort of connection to your institution.
Like the coffee break during the interview process, breaks from serious posting are important in developing your library’s presence online. To date, my single most successful Tumblr post (judging by the number of times it was liked and reblogged) was a photo of a bit of manuscript waste in a 17th century book – nothing overly rare or unique, but a joking exchange with another librarian (again ex-tabulis) about turning it into a historical mystery movie script saw it reblogged by around thirty other users. Hardly viral, but encouraging nonetheless.
What got the image of our book spread was not the value in it alone, but that little connection that was built in the brief back-and-forth conversation. Formal language does little in the way of effectively building social relationships, but relaxed, friendly language goes hand in hand with the lateral connections that social media relies on. Self-promotion is not only a matter of showing what you can do, but showing that you can fit into the community you’re joining.
Besides, even academic libraries need to be a place of fun sometimes.
See y’all online.
Marcus Ladd Special Collections Librarian

By: laddmm on: May 01, 2013 9:21 am | laddmm


Late last year a new book by Dr. John H. “Jack” White, Jr. (MU ’58) was published by the Indiana University Press.  Wet Britches and Muddy Boots: A History of Travel in Victorian America is noteworthy for many reasons, as the laudatory reviews now appearing make clear.

The book spans the millennia of human travel but focuses primarily on travel in the nineteenth century, when transportation was revolutionized by industrialization. It especially focuses on the experience of travel. What was it like to ride a stagecoach from one town to the next? Or travel by steamboat? What were roads like? Accommodations?  Food?  And how long did it take to travel distances we scarcely give a thought to today?

Jack has written the work as popular history; it is indeed highly readable and illustrated with a wide range of helpful and fascinating images. But it is also based on meticulous research. Jack, after all, retired as Senior Historian after a long curatorial career at the Smithsonian Institution in the Division of Transportation, Museum of History and Technology. His authority is well-established by a number of distinguished publications.


We in Special Collections are especially delighted with the book because Jack is a loyal friend and supporter and because he did much of his research right here. Our collections are rich in primary resources for the nineteenth century, and transportation is a particularly strong area. We know how much time and effort Jack invested in research and writing. So we take special pride in his achievement.

Jack’s achievement is also an achievement for the former Head of Special Collections, Janet Stuckey, who supported, assisted, and (according to Jack) occasionally pushed him to the finish line. Jack is generously donating the profits from the book to the Miami University Libraries Janet Stuckey Fund, which supports acquisitions for Special Collections.

So it’s a win-win. And win. That last “win” is yours when you read the book.

Elizabeth Brice
Assistant Dean for Technical Services and
Head, Special Collections & Archives


By: micheljp on: April 25, 2013 3:16 pm | micheljp @jpmichel

The Center for Digital Scholarship had its Open House on Tuesday to much fanfare. The CDS is both a physical facility and a service of the Libraries. Our vision is to serve as a collaborative partner with faculty, students, and staff by providing digital library , data repository, multi-media, digitization, scholarly communication, geospatial and data management services so that members of the Miami community can accomplish their research, scholarly, and teaching goals.

Check out the CDS for more info and get started!

By: Anonymous (not verified) on: September 25, 2015 10:41 am | Anonymous

Earth Day is coming up on April 22nd. Government Documents has all the resources you need to be informed and active in protecting our planet.

We have print materials with titles, such as

Plants for People: The Psychological and Physiological Effects of Plants,

Herbs and Herb Gardening: an annotated bibliography and resource guide

and Landscaping for Energy Efficiency.

To hear some “green tips,” be sure to check out some of these podcasts from the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

That’s not all! There are plenty of relevant events and opportunities all around the country worthy of your attention. On a closer level, visit the EPA’s “Cleanups in My Community” page. Finally, find out even more you can personally do to protect and preserve our atmosphere by reading some of these simple steps.

For more information, visit or stop by Government Documents in Ground Floor, King Library.

By: micheljp on: April 09, 2013 10:52 am | micheljp @jpmichel

By all accounts Astrophysicist, Popular Scientist and all-around badass, Neil Degrasse Tyson gave a riveting speech last night in Millett Hall. The inspiration doesn't need to end there. Continue to be inspired by Dr. Tyson through his scholarship and popular writings. We've got it all:

Books by Dr. Neil Degrasse Tyson
 Death by Black Hole: and other Cosmic Quandaries

 The Pluto Files: the Rise and Fall of America's Favorite Planet

 Universe Down to Earth

 One Universe: at Home in the Cosmos

Popular and Scholarly Articles
Go here to read nearly 200 popular magazine articles. To view much of Dr. Tyson's scholarly writings, go to Web of Science and search - tyson nd - in the author field.

Happy Researching!!

By: johnsoeo on: March 29, 2013 11:28 am | johnsoeo

The libraries have started trial access to a web based software called SimplyMap. It comes with both a large variety of census and business data and all the shape files to create an impressive array of maps.

The program is very simple to use and can in a few minutes create maps that will give student's research papers an extra edge. Humanities, Business and Marketing students will probably find the program especially useful as well as anyone interested in mapping.

Files can also be downloaded for use in image processing tools like Photoshop as well as GIS software such as ArcMap.

The trial will last until April 30.

or if off campus:

A short video on how to use SimplyMap: