News & Notes

By: crosbylm on: April 25, 2012 9:47 am | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

We now have access to Cities in American Political History, an easy to use database offering a number of unique resources. This database highlights ten eras of political development in America and spans the Revolution and Founding era (1776-1790) to the post-Cold War present (1989-2011). The ten most populous cities in the United States during each of these eras are detailed. Information includes city government and politics; industry, commerce, and labor; and race, ethnicity and immigration.

To use the database, you can browse by era or city, read Overviews of cities in each time period, access population statistics, or scan Quick Facts (including info such as city mayors, industries and employers, newspapers, and events). One of my favorite features was included photos and images of cities throughout history. Check out the image below of the shoreline of Cincinnati in the early nineteenth century, and explore more images here.

"Cincinnati Shoreline." In Cities in American Political History, edited by Richard Dilworth, 179. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2011. http://library.cqpress.com/cities/capf-1285-71982-2387679.

Connect to this database from either of these links:
http://library.cqpress.com/cities/
http://www.lib.muohio.edu/indexes/redirect/981

By: micheljp on: April 18, 2012 3:49 pm | micheljp @jpmichel

The Miami University Libraries Civil War Programming Committee and Diversity Cluster are co-sponsoring a film showing and discussion of the award winning film Glory on Thursday, April 19th between 6 and 8:30 in King Library 320. There will be refreshments and door prizes, including DVDs of several popular Civil War documentaries and films! Free and open to the public. It's the last program in our Let's Talk About It: Civil War series. You can see more information about our programs this year on our website: http://libguides.lib.muohio.edu/civilwar

Glory won three Academy Awards in 1989 (best supporting actor, best cinematography, and best sound). It tells the story of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, the first formal unit of the US Army to be made up of African American men, during the Civil War. It stars Denzel Washington, Morgan Freeman and Matthew Broderick (the guy from Ferris Bueller's Day Off). Please join us for this moving and educational film. Hope to see you there!

By: micheljp on: April 17, 2012 5:54 pm | micheljp @jpmichel

The 2012 Pulitzer Prizes were awarded yesterday. Here's a look at some of the winning work:Pulitzer Prize for HistoryMalcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning MarableThis biography of Malcolm X draws on new research to trace his life from his troubled youth through his involvement in the Nation of Islam, his activism in the world of Black Nationalism, and his assassination. Years in the making, it is a definitive biography of the legendary black activist.Pulitzer Prize for BiographyGeorge F. Kennan: An American Life by John Lewis GaddisA remarkably revealing view of how this greatest of Cold War strategists came to doubt his strategy and always doubted himself.Pulitzer Prize for PoetryLife on Mars by Tracy: Poems by Tracy K. SmithPulitzer Prize for General NonfictionThe Swerve: How the World Became Modern by Stephen GreenblattIn this book the author transports readers to the dawn of the Renaissance and chronicles the life of an intrepid book lover who rescued the Roman philosophical text On the Nature of Things from certain oblivion. In this work he has crafted both a work of history and a story of discovery, in which one manuscript, plucked from a thousand years of neglect, changed the course of human thought and made possible the world as we know it. 

By: crosbylm on: April 16, 2012 9:41 am | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

Are you a poet aspiring to get published, but not sure where to start? The library can help! Check out this recently added database, The Directory of Poetry Publishers.

The directory contains a Publisher Index, Regional Index, Subject Index, and eBooks Menu. You can navigate to these features from any page in the directory, as they are included at the bottom of each page.

The Publisher Index contains listings of both magazines and book publishers. Magazines are listed in the directory in italics and all caps. Presses are listed in normal type. Publisher names preceded by a bullet were recently added to the directory. Clicking on the name of the magazine or press takes you to an entry of information about the press. Have questions about the contents of entries? Every entry has a link to the Key to Directory Listings. The Key provides detailed information about the contents and navigational features of listings.

The Regional Index lists publishers by state and country. The main page of the Regional Index offers a quick glance at publishers in each region, listing number of publishers beside specific states and countries in brackets.

Similarly, the Subject Index compiles periodicals and presses publishing specific subjects. Subjects are listed in alphabetical order. Number of publishers listing subjects is displayed next to subject description, in brackets, on the main page.

Clicking on the eBooks Menu button directs you to the main page for Dustbooks eDirectories. Once on the main page, you can click on The Directory of Poetry Publishers to return to the directory... or, you can explore some of our other, newly acquired Dustbooks products! These other products (The International Directory of Little Magazines & Small Presses, The Directory of Small Press/Magazine Editors & Publishers, and The Small Press Record of Books in Print) will be discussed in later blog posts.

By: crosbylm on: March 27, 2012 11:04 am | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

The Oxford Writing Festival kicks off today! Gail Carson Levine, author of Ella Enchanted, is among the writers scheduled to participate in the festival. Whether you're reading Levine’s works for the first time or, like me, revisiting some of your favorites in anticipation of the author’s attendance, you can find a number of titles by this popular author at the library:

Ella Enchanted

King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv | PZ7.L578345 El 1997

The Two Princesses of Bamarre

King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv | PZ7.L578345 Tw 2001

Fairest

King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv | PZ8.L4793 Fa 2006

Dave at Night

King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv | PZ7.L578345 Dav 1999

Betsy Who Cried Wolf

King Library, Ground Floor, IMC, Juv Easy | PZ7.L578345 Be 2002

Levine is scheduled to speak and facilitate a workshop Thursday, March 29th in the Shriver Multi-Purpose Room. The Oxford Writing Festival is scheduled March 26-29. For more information and the official event schedule, visit http://spw.mugroups.org/.

By: brickeje on: March 13, 2012 8:59 am | brickeje

I read Flatland so many years ago that I don’t remember most of the details of the story. I do remember that I was captivated by the idea of a two-dimensional world inhabited by geometric figures and their struggle to comprehend worlds of one-dimensional and three-dimensional beings. The story was narrated by A Square, which also happened to be the pseudonym that Edwin Abbott Abbott used to disguise his identity when he published this satire on class and social problems in 19th century Britain. Flatland has been in print continuously since it was first published in 1884. One book publisher referred to Flatland as a precursor of modern science fiction. Special Collections has a first edition copy of this book. We also have a flat copy, our Arion Press edition.

In 1980 Arion Press published Flatland in an accordion-fold format of 56 folded panels. The book is bound in aluminum covers and is housed in an aluminum frame with a hinged top that closes with a clasp. The title is stamped on the covers in black. This edition was limited to 275 hand-numbered copies, of which our copy is 72. The introduction was written by Ray Bradbury and he has signed and numbered the book. The illustrations and 10 mounted die-cut panels were done by the printer, Andrew Hoyem, based on designs by the author. Hoyem signed the Colophon.

The panels for Flatland unfold to a length of 33 feet with text printed on each side, making this a 66 foot long book. Each panel of the book is 7 by 14 inches. Hoyem’s design is a creative expression of the plane of existence for the two dimensional story that Abbot tells. I am intrigued by this book every time I have the opportunity to look at it.

Arion Press was founded in San Francisco in 1974 by Andrew Hoyem and has been called the Nation’s leading publisher of fine-press books. They have printed 93 books to date, mostly by letterpress. The illustrations are often original prints by significant artists. Special Collections has a number of books published by Arion Press, including works by Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, Jim Dine, and William Shakespeare, to name a few. Check the library catalog for a more complete listing of books by Arion Press in our collections.

By: zaslowbj on: March 13, 2012 8:58 am | zaslowbj

Mar. 1, 2012 and ongoing: A display in the cases on the left (south) side of the main entrance to King Library showcases Miami University Libraries' participation in the university-wide celebration of the Year of the Arts (http://arts.muohio.edu/yearofthearts). Contributions reflect various aspects of arts including architecture, costume, dance, drama, music, painting, poetry, and sculpture. Participating library units: Wertz Art/Architecture Library, Amos Music Library, Walter Havighurst Special Collections, and King Library; staff coordinators: Arianne Hartsell-Gundy, Information Services Librarian (Literature and Theatre); Kimberly Tully, Special Collections Librarian; Jessica Wray, Library Associate (Art); Barry Zaslow, Music Librarian

By: brickeje on: February 07, 2012 11:10 am | brickeje

The Walter Havighurst Special Collections is home to over 65,000 volumes, manuscripts and archives. Some of the volumes are rare, some are unique; all are special in some way. All of us who work in Special Collections develop attachments to certain books in the collections, for a variety of reasons; perhaps because of an elaborate cover, or because of memories that a book triggers, or because of the provenance of a particular volume. The reasons are as varied as the individuals who work here.

One of my favorites is a small volume of poetry by an author that I discovered in late 1971. Richard Brautigan was a poet, short story writer and novelist with a unique imagination. The Dictionary of Literary Biography wrote that "Brautigan is commonly seen as the bridge between the Beat Movement of the 1950s and the youth revolution of the 1960s." I had discovered some Brautigan books on a friend’s bookshelf and soon had read most of his published work. I was excited when I found Please Plant This Book in Special Collections many years ago because this was one book of his that I had not read. It is a collection of eight poems, each written on a seed packet filled with seeds. It was published in 1968 with a note on the back cover that states: “THIS BOOK IS FREE. Permission is granted to reprint this book by anyone as long as it is not sold.” Some of the author’s thoughts about this publication are expressed in the poem on the package of Shasta Daisy seeds.

SHASTA DAISY

I pray that in thirty years passing
that flowers and vegetables will
water the Twenty-First Century
with their voices telling that they
were once a book turned by loving
hands into life.

The text of this book can now be found easily on the web, with interactive sites displaying the individual poems, but in the 1970’s this volume was difficult to track down. It is nice to be able to see the book in its original format. Other poems/seeds in this volume are: Squash, Sweet Alyssum Royal Carpet, Parsley, Lettuce, California Native Flowers, Carrots and Calendula. Some printings of this book have planting instructions on the reverse side of the seed package. Our copy does not.

Please peruse our new website, or check the Library’s catalog, to explore the collections of the Walter Havighurst Special Collections. Perhaps there is something here that will capture your imagination.

By: millarj on: October 28, 2011 10:41 am | millarj

So, you want to support open access and highlight your work at the same time? Consider creating a personalized faculty profile and contributing your scholarly work to Scholarly Commons, Miami's portal to faculty scholarship.

Don't have a lot of free time? No problem. The new Scholars Portal is easy and quick to setup. Here's a step by step guide:

Step 1: Point your web browser to http://scholars.muohio.edu and click on "Create/Edit your Profile"

Step 2: Login with your Miami uniqued and password

Step 3: Edit your information (include a candid or formal photo if you want)

Step 4: Press the "Submit Changes" button.

That's it! Four short steps and your profile is complete.

Once you're ready to contribute your work, simply choose the "Create/Edit your profile" and then click the big red "Get Started Button".

If you have questions about getting your work ready for submission, feel free to email commons@lib.muohio.edu or talk to your library liaison.

By: bazelejw on: October 27, 2011 11:21 am | bazelejw @@jwbazeley

Currently, there is a dizzying array of open access resources available to students and scholars online, and it is often difficult to determine the quality of these resources. In order to make users aware of quality open access resources, the library has identified specific resources and added entries and links for these resources to our website and catalog.

In the Databases A to Z list, there are links to a number of high quality sources of open access materials:

ArXiv is a repository hosted by Cornell University which includes open access to more than 700,000 e-prints in physics, mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance, and statistics.

The Directory of Open Access Journals is an aggregation of over 7,000 online journals across all subjects which are peer reviewed or have editorial quality control.

ProQuest’s Dissertations and Theses Open provides the full text of open access dissertations and theses free of charge (the authors of these theses and dissertations have opted to publish as open access).

Additional freely available full-text dissertations can be found at the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, where numerous participating institutions deposit dissertations.

At the FDSYS site, you’ll find open access to authenticated information directly from the United States Government through the Government Printing Office.

If you’re interested in electronic books, the National Academies Press has recently made PDFs of the majority of its publications (over 4,000 monographs) freely available at their website. These monographs consist of reports published by various government academies, including the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and the National Research Council. Registration is free and required before your first download from the site.

In our Journals A to Z list, you will find links for many open access journals, identifiable by the presence of a small globe icon and the text “Open Access”.

If you are browsing the library’s online catalog, a keyword search on “open access” under the Journal Titles tab will bring up entries for numerous open access journals available online.