News & Notes

By: luceyka on: November 19, 2012 12:47 pm | luceyka

In his recent article “Games and  21st Century Standards—an Ideal Partnership,” library technology specialist Brian Mayer ties game-based education to the Common Core Standards. He primarily discusses how games lend themselves to the inquiry process now being emphasized in the curriculum. And depending on the type of game, “the inquiry process takes the course of the entire game, a single turn, or only moments”.

You’re in luck! The Instructional Materials Center (IMC), Ground Floor King holds dozens of games and interactive curriculum materials to extend learning: board games, puppets, a forensic kit, magic tricks.

Notes:  In the catalog, search on the Subject “Games” or the Keyword “Puppet,” then limit results to “IMC”. Also, we do not carry computer games.

Here’s a list of articles that outline many more possibilities in the game department:

To search for your own ideas, try using the Education Full Text database and searching the Subject term “Educational Games”.

Have fun!

By: micheljp on: November 19, 2012 9:51 am | micheljp @jpmichel

On this day in 1863 on the Battlefield of Gettysburg, President Abraham Lincoln gave one our country's most enduring and mythical speeches, the Gettysburg Address.

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

The significance of this speech is varied and far-reaching.  We have several books specifically about the speech as well as over a thousand books, movies and other resources dedicated to President Abraham Lincoln.

Check out some of these resources for Thanksgiving Break!

Ooh and check out this beautiful video honoring the iconic speech:

By: micheljp on: November 14, 2012 9:24 am | micheljp @jpmichel

The Miami University Libraries are currently administering usability tests for certain aspects of the library web site. We are seeking undergraduate & graduate students as well as faculty members to help us with these tests. Participants will be asked to interact with library interfaces and their actions will help us create better user environments. The process will take approximately 30 minutes. We are offering $15 iTunes gift cards for participants. Those interested should send an email to Jason Paul Michel at micheljp@muohio.edu

By: crosbylm on: October 29, 2012 9:42 am | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

One of our newest resources, Alternative Press Index with Archive, is now available for Oxford campus users only. This EBSCOhost resource is a bibliographic database of journal, newspaper, and magazine articles. Coverage in API Archive spans 1969-1990, and API’s coverage begins in 1991. Content comes from 700+ international alternative, radical, and left periodicals. View the complete lists of periodicals in both API and API Archive by selecting the Publications tab in the database toolbar.

Topics covered include theories and practices of socialism, revolution, ecology, democracy, anarchism, feminism, organized labor, indigenous peoples, and gay and lesbian issues. Oxford campus users can access Alternative Press Index with Archives from the following link: http://www.lib.muohio.edu/indexes/redirect/1080

By: bazelejw on: October 25, 2012 11:26 am | bazelejw @@jwbazeley

Currently, there is a dizzying array of open access resources available to students and scholars online, and it is often difficult to determine the quality of these resources. In order to make users aware of quality open access resources, the library has identified specific resources and added entries and links for these resources to our website and catalog. In the Databases A to Z list, there are links to a number of high quality sources of open access materials.

ArXiv is a repository hosted by Cornell University which includes open access to more than 700,000 e-prints in physics, mathematics, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance, and statistics.

The Directory of Open Access Journals is an aggregation of over 7,000 online journals across all subjects which are peer reviewed or have editorial quality control.

ProQuest’s Dissertations and Theses Open provides the full text of open access dissertations and theses free of charge (the authors of these theses and dissertations have opted to publish as open access).

Additional freely available full-text dissertations can be found at the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations, where numerous participating institutions deposit dissertations.

At the FDSYS site, you’ll find open access to authenticated information directly from the United States Government through the Government Printing Office.

If you’re interested in electronic books, the National Academies Press has made PDFs of the majority of its publications (over 4,000 monographs) freely available at their website. These monographs consist of reports published by various government academies, including the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and the National Research Council. Registration is free and required before your first download from the site.

Another place to access quality open access electronic books is from the Directory of Open Access Books, which is a service of the OAPEN Foundation. The OAPEN Foundation is an international initiative dedicated to Open Access monograph publishing, based at the National Library in The Hague. DOAB contains more than 1,000 academic peer-reviewed books from more than two dozen publishers.

In our Journals A to Z list, you will find links for many open access journals, identifiable by the presence of a small globe icon and the text “Open Access”. If you are browsing the library’s online catalog, a keyword search on “open access” under the Journal Titles tab will bring up entries for numerous open access journals available online.

By: revellaa on: October 22, 2012 6:15 pm | revellaa

Many humanists believe that the debates raging around open access in the natural sciences are not related to them. "Our research is not usually funded by tax payers," they say. "Unlike the STEM disciplines, our journals have a reasonable subscription price," they argue. And both of these arguments are factually correct. However, the serials crisis caused by rising journal prices and shrinking library budgets indirectly impacts humanities scholars and their ability to access the peer-reviewed scholarly literature in their fields.

When libraries are faced with the need to cut journal subscriptions due to rising costs or budget reductions, they don't simply cut the most expensive items. What they do is look at usage data to locate those journals which are used the least and cut enough of those subscriptions to make up the difference. In other words, we cut off the "long tail." And although some humanities titles see high usage, the bulk of this "long tail" are specialized titles in the humanities. And it is in these titles were humanists try the groundbreaking new approaches that shape their fields. But given the undergraduate-heavy usage patterns at Miami, these titles see less use than similar journals in the sciences and social sciences. So, the rapidly rising costs of journals in other disciplines does have an impact on access to humanities research.

What can scholars do about this? Humanists could publish their research in one of the many open access journals in their field, but they may not be as prestigious as more traditional titles. Subscription revenue is important to the continued survival of academic societies so many journals have been reluctant to switch to an open access model. This being said, many journals in the humanities allow their authors to self-archive a copy of the final published version of their articles in an institutional repository. Even those journals without an express statement of support for self-archiving in their copyright transfer agreement (CTA) will usually allow authors to post their work online in some form if asked via an author addendum to the CTA. Miami's Scholars Portal and the connected Scholarly Commons is Miami's institutional repository. Posting your work in Scholarly Commons not only increases access to your research by other scholars, but also allows other interested parties to read your work. In other words, the general public who lives without access to academic journals will be able to access your research. Additionally, the Scholars Portal allows Miami faculty to create profiles to provide a public face for the work contained in the Scholarly Commons. These profiles have a persistant easy to remember URL as well as basic profile and contact information. If you would like some assistance in creating your Scholars Portal profile and getting your work added to the Scholarly Commons, please contact Jen Waller at wallerjl@muohio.edu.

Additional Resources

By: wallerjl on: October 22, 2012 6:16 pm | wallerjl @@jenniferwaller

Today marks the start of Open Access Week! Libraries around the world will spend this week celebrating open access principles, and Miami's libraries are no exception. Just a few things on tap this week include:

  • Free "Ask me about Open Access" buttons available at service desks throughout the libraries.
  • A display in the foyer of King Library that answers, "What are all these locks for?"
  • A free webcast of the SPARC/WorldBank panel discussion, "Perspectives on Open Access: Practice, Progress, and Pitfalls" in King 114 on Monday, 10/22/12, from 4:00pm-5:30pm.
  • A free Digital Humanities Symposium on Tuesday, 10/23/12, from 3:00pm - 6:30pm in King 320 (see http://libguides.lib.muohio.edu/digital-humanities )
  • A free presentation, "How Open Scholarship is Changing Research," by William Gunn, Ph.D. and Head of Academic Outreach for Mendeley. 4:30pm-5:30pm on Thursday, 10/25/12, in McGuffey 322 (see http://staff.lib.muohio.edu/~revellaa/gunn.html )

For information about these events and links to other open access resources, please go to http://staff.lib.muohio.edu/~revellaa/2012oa.html.

Happy Open Access Week!

By: grabacka on: October 23, 2012 12:58 pm | grabacka

October 19 is National Geologic Map Day.  This is a recognition of the significance of this form of mapping, that seeks to map the earth beneath the surface.  These maps convey important information about the geology of regions.  They are also esthetically pleasing uses of color and shape.

In recognition, the United States Geological Survey releases a greatly revised resource, the National Geological Map Database, which provides access to a large database of geological maps through a Map Catalog, of over 90,000 maps from the USGS as well as more than 600 other publishers.  A new Map Viewer offers an additional discovery tool.  Another important resource at this site is Stratigraphy to identify geological names, charts and guidelines.

Miami University Libraries has geological maps in various forms, both digital and in print format.  The Geology subject guide includes the page Geological Mapping, that describes many of these publications, maps, and resources.  USGS maps, maps by the Ohio Geological Survey, and various recently published maps by other state geological surveys are descibed here.  Included are several recent maps, as well as classic maps that have retained importance through the years.  To find such resources in the catalog, a Subject search with the terms "Geology," regional name, and "Maps."  For example , the 2005 Geologic Map of North America is listed with the subject Geology - North America - Maps.  This will also retrieve the related Database of the Geologic Map of North America.  Both of these items are in the Libraries collections, as well as available as web pages at the USGS site.

Books about geologic mapping are available with the subject Geological mapping.  A book by Simon Winchester, The Map that Changed the World : William Smith and the Birth of Modern Geology, describes the creation of the world's first geological map, of Great Britain, in the early decades of the 1800s.  Reproductions of two versions of this map are on view in the Geology Department in Shideler Hall.  Other siginifcant geological maps are viewable there, as well as in the Libraries collections.

By: crosbylm on: October 19, 2012 1:47 pm | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

The Libraries now provide access to original source material from the Foreign Office, Colonial Office, War Office and Cabinet Papers through the databases Middle East Online Series 1: Arab-Israeli Relations, 1917-1970 and Middle East Online Series 2: Iraq, 1914-1974. Series 1 includes content from 1917-1971, containing topics such as Black September, the Border wars of the 1950s, Jewish terror groups, and more. Series 2 includes content from 1920-1974, and is comprised of topics such as the Arab uprising of 1920, Oil concessions and oil exploration, Iran-Iraq relations, and more.

These resources will prove useful for Middle East and Islamic Studies minors and History, Political Science, and International Studies majors alike. Take some time to check them out. Who knows, you may find just what you need to finish up your midterm paper!

Use these links to get connected:

Middle East Online Series 1: Arab-Israeli Relations, 1917-1970: http://www.lib.muohio.edu/indexes/redirect/1071

Middle East Online Series 2: Iraq, 1914-1974: http://www.lib.muohio.edu/indexes/redirect/1072

By: crosbylm on: October 10, 2012 7:55 pm | crosbylm @LMBirkenhauer

Access to Oxford Bibliographies Online: Cinema and Media Studies is now available. If you’re working on a research paper for your film studies, theater, or digital game studies class, this is the perfect place to start. This resource offers 70+ peer-reviewed guides focusing on a wide variety of topics. Some examples of topics include: Acting, YouTube, Censorship, Reality Television and much, much more. Each guide is authored by cinema and media studies scholars, and includes a general overview of the topic and detailed list of important related books, articles, and websites.

Access this resource from the A-Z Databases list or the following link: http://www.lib.muohio.edu/indexes/redirect/1077

Other available Oxford Bibliographies Online resources include:

NEW! Oxford Bibliographies Online: Childhood Studies

NEW! Oxford Bibliographies Online: International Relations

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Communication

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Islamic Studies

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Latin American Studies