News & Notes

By: micheljp on: February 17, 2010 8:57 am | micheljp @jpmichel

The Miami University Libraries are proud to host the 21st African American Read-In on Monday, February 22nd from 1pm to 3pm in room 320 of King Library. More information -- and a host of books to read and share -- are available online at the Libraries Diversity page.

Register and get more reading ideas here!

By: grabacka on: February 16, 2010 2:59 pm | grabacka


This month the world will turn to Vancouver, British Columbia, when the 2010 Winter Olympic Games take place. From February 12 through 28, skaters, skiers, sledders, snowboarders, and curlers will compete in and around this West Coast city.
  • Olympic.org

    Provides useful information about Olympics activities, links to related sites.

  • Vancouver2010.com

    The official site for the events. Find out about events, about venues, schedules, results, and more. Maps and images of the region are online, and in the maps collection, show the communities and the event locations. The Venues page tells what events are to be held there, and at the Transportation tab, gives directions to the venue with a street map of the arena location.
I created a Google Map to show the venues in Vancouver and vicinity, at Cypress Mountain, and in Whistler. Natural Resources Canada provides this satellite view with a guide to using imagery. Successive views focus on specific areas, and reveal that BC Place, site of the opening and closing ceremonies, and awards ceremonies each night, is visible from space.

New maps in the our collection cover this area, as well. Four of them are by International Travel Maps, based in the Vancouver area:
Finally, a blog, Beyond Binary, by Ina Friend at Cnet, has begun a series of articles on the science and technology of the Winter Games, beginning with one on the issue of preserving snow at Cypress Mountain, site of the freestyle skiing and snowboarding events.
By: sullive4 on: February 05, 2010 9:24 am | sullive4 @muElibrarian

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jessyrandall/ / CC BY 2.0

It may be cliche for librarians to talk about their favorite books, but I don't remember having a favorite until I read J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye as a junior in high school. Like a lot of teenagers, I related to Holden's frustration of being caught between childhood and adulthood - wishing for innocent eyes like those of his sister Phoebe but having experienced too much of the corrupt adult world to ignore. It's this state of inbetween - of adolescence - that attracts so many teens to this book.

J.D. Salinger died last week at the age of 91, nearly 60 years after The Catcher in the Rye was first published. If you haven't read it, I encourage you to pick up a copy. If you have read it, try picking up one of his other books or checking out some of the copies we have in Special Collections on the 3rd floor of King.

By: sullive4 on: January 25, 2010 6:32 pm | sullive4 @muElibrarian

Here at Miami, we're connected to dozens of academic and public libraries throughout the state of Ohio which means if you're looking for a book that's not on the shelf and another library in the state has an available copy, you can request to borrow theirs and pick it up at any of Miami's libraries.

Watch the video to learn how:

How to Request an Item from OhioLINK from Miami U. Libraries on Vimeo.

Note that it takes 2-4 business days for your item to arrive and checkout is generally for 3 weeks.

By: micheljp on: January 25, 2010 2:40 pm | micheljp @jpmichel

The following is a good collection of information and resources regarding the devastating Haitian earthquakes. If you know of any good resources, let us know.

News & Emergency Information

  • Crisis Map of Haiti
    This real-time map is updated with emergency information coming from SMS messages, the web, email, radio, telephone and other sources. It's the most comprehensive map for humanitarian and relief efforts.
  • Google Crisis Response
    A comprehensive resources with information about donations and charity, videos, Google Earth imagery. Also includes a person finder!
  • United States State Department
    Information on the earthquakes and the relief response from the State Department.

Relief Efforts/Donations

Social Media

Comment

By: micheljp on: September 24, 2010 1:35 pm | micheljp @jpmichel

The Miami University Libraries is pleased to announce the launch of its new mobile site. Check it out at http://www.lib.muohio.edu/m on any mobile browsing device.

Mobile Miami University Libraries from Miami U. Libraries on Vimeo.
Searching

You can search all of the library's holdings including books, dvds, cds and more. You can also search some of our most popular databases including Academic Search Complete!

Research and Help

Can't find a book on the shelves upstairs or need help with research? Just text or IM us directly from the new mobile site! You can also send an email or call subject specialists.

Social Media

Read our blog or check out our Twitter feed or Facebook fan page!

More

Check hours and get GPS directions (iPhone) to all of our locations!

iPhone/Touch Users

Make the mobile site even easier to access by adding an icon for it on your home screen. Here's how:

  • Go to "www.lib.muohio.edu/m" on your iPhone/Touch.
  • Click on the Add Bookmark sign at the bottom of the screen.
  • Click on Add to Home Screen.
  • Change the name of the link if you'd like.
  • Click the Add button at the top of the page and the Miami University Libraries icon will now appear on your iPhone screen and will be a direct link to the site.
By: grabacka on: January 11, 2010 11:16 am | grabacka

This web site takes a new slant on city rankings.
http://www.walkscore.com/

It shows rankings for major cities based on the ease of use for pedestrians. One can also create a personal ranking based on a particular address. Results will show distances to amenities such as businesses and services. It will display a Google map based on the address with the businesses identified. The intention is to help citizens reduce dependency on automobiles to carry out daily activities.

For those to whom that is important, this an interesting, potentially a useful tool.
However, the nature of the criterion, walkability for a commuter or shopper, is possible more for urban dwellers than for any other group. Another caveat, although it may change, is that distances are calculated 'as the crow flies', that is in a straight line from starting point to destination. Of course, nobody in an urban, suburban, or rural setting, can walk in a straight line to a market, a bank, a library, or whatever. There is false information included in the database (it claims that in my suburban neighborhood, one of my neighbors is operating a Subway shop!). These factors may be minor to some users, may be crucial to others.

One can join a discussion, vote on criteria to improve the algorithm, and participate in other aspects of the site. It is an interesting site that offers urban dwellers, and potential urban dwellers, an additional method to evaluate or to choose a place to live. It also offers the student of urban life an additional tool for that area of study.

By: bazelejw on: January 08, 2010 9:49 am | bazelejw @@jwbazeley

James H. Billington, the Librarian of Congress, has selected 25 motion pictures that will be preserved as cultural, artistic and/or historical treasures for generations to come. Spanning the period 1911-1995, the films named to the 2009 National Film Registry of the Library of Congress range from the sci-fi classic "The Incredible Shrinking Man" and Bette Davis’ Oscar-winning performance in "Jezebel" to the Muppets’ movie debut and Michael Jackson’s iconic video "Thriller." This year’s selections bring the number of films in the registry to 525.

To see the complete list of 25 motion pictures selected for 2009:
http://www.loc.gov/today/pr/2009/09-250.html

To nominate films for the 2010 National Film Registry:
http://www.loc.gov/film/

By: messnekr on: January 06, 2010 1:59 pm | messnekr

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) now invites your input on the *management* of policies to deliver public access to the published results of taxpayer-funded research, to be submitted to the online discussion no later than TOMORROW, January 7, 2010.

*All* are urged to respond to this pivotal opportunity and to encourage researchers, students, and others to weigh in. Your input will be critical in helping the administration to form a deep and balanced view of stakeholders’ interest in ensuring public access to publicly funded research.

The questions before us now are:

  • Compliance. What features does a public access policy need to ensure compliance? Should this vary across agencies?
  • Evaluation. How should an agency determine whether a public access policy is successful? What measures could agencies use to gauge whether there is increased return on federal investment gained by expanded access?
  • Roles. How might a public private partnership promote robust management of a public access policy? Are there examples already in use that may serve as models? What is the best role for the Federal government?
  • (See the full post at http://blog.ostp.gov/2010/01/01/policy-forum-on-public-access-to-federally-funded-research-management/).

    This is the last of the three announced phases of the online discussion. The first two phases focused on public access policy implementation as well as on features and technology. From January 8 to 21, the online discussion will revisit in more detail aspects of the conversation that warrant deeper exploration. To participate, visit the Public Access Policy blog at http://blog.ostp.gov/category/public-access-policy. Comments emailed to publicaccess@ostp.gov are also accepted, but will still be posted to the blog by the moderator.

    General comments, addressing any part of the Request for Information, may be submitted to the Federal Register no later than January 21. See the full notice at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/E9-29322.htm for details.

    via SPARC (http://www.arl.org/sparc)

By: bazelejw on: December 11, 2009 11:06 am | bazelejw @@jwbazeley

Ebrary, a platform for viewing digital content, has created an information center to bring together current information about the H1N1 influenza. The site was created by ebrary employees, in the course of researching H1N1 to protect their families and friends.
While some of the most important information in the world is contained within PDF documents, it is a very difficult format to search, use, and manage online. To enable people to discover valuable H1N1 data, ebrary has created a highly interactive database of PDF documents from government agencies and other authoritative sites (copyrights permitting or with permission).

Access the information center here:
http://h1n1.ebrary.com/home.action

Due to Pandemic H1N1 Influenza (formerly known as Swine Flu) and concerns about the 2009/2010 flu season, the EBSCO Publishing Medical and Nursing editors of DynaMed™, Nursing Reference Center™ (NRC) and Patient Education Reference Center™ (PERC) have made key influenza information from these resources freely available to health care providers worldwide. The information is designed to inform patients and their families and provide information to clinicians to help them with H1N1 diagnosis and H1N1 treatment by making up-to-date diagnosis and treatment information available. The resources being made available will also provide up-to-date information about the H1N1 vaccine.
The editorial teams will monitor the research and update these resources continuously throughout the flu season.

Access the portal here:
http://www.ebscohost.com/flu/