News & Notes

By: weavered on: September 16, 2015 6:10 pm | weavered

Vote here:

Taylor Swift 1989 album cover

Amos Music Library would like your vote to help decide which 2014 popular music album is to be added to the collection. 2013's winner was Lorde's "Pure Heroine," now a part of Amos Music Library's Spotlight Collection. This year's nominees were selected based on year-end best-of lists by various popular publications, as well as overall sales and Grammy nominations. Voting ends 2/15/15.

Many of the nominated artists can be heard on our 2014 Spotify playlist: 

Vote here:

By: laddmm on: January 08, 2015 9:09 am | laddmm

from East of the Sun and West of the Moon by Kay Nielsen, 1922, in the King Collection of Juvenile Literature.
from East of the Sun and West of the Moon by Kay Nielsen, 1922, in the King Collection of Juvenile Literature.

Happy New Year everyone, from all of us in Special Collections. We are looking forward to an exciting new year, full of changes.

First of all, we are welcoming a new Head of Special Collections & Archives, William M. Modrow. Bill comes to us from Florida State University and brings rich experience in instruction and outreach as well as rare books. You’ll be getting to know Bill virtually on these pages in the coming months, but I hope you’ll have the opportunity to meet him face to face as well. I know he’ll bring some great direction to the department.

Of course, change can be bittersweet. We had to say goodbye to Kim Tully last month when she left to accept a position at Temple University. We thank Kim for all she did while she was here and wish her well in her new job. We know she’ll do great things for Temple.

We are in the process of searching for Kim’s replacement, so we’ll be welcoming another librarian in the spring.

Speaking of spring, our spring semester exhibit will be curated by Katie Wills, a Miami history graduate student, who is producing a fascinating exhibit as part of her thesis. The Ready Ones: American Children, World War II, and Propaganda will be available in the Special Collections exhibit gallery from Monday, January 26 through May 15, 2015.

We're also delighted to have a new graduate assistant for spring semester. Dana Bogart, also a history grad student, will be completing her master's in May. Dana started working with us in December and is already proving herself an asset to the department.

Check back with us here for more on the exhibit, the spring exhibit reception, and some other changes coming later this year.

Meanwhile, stay warm, everyone, and best wishes for a happy, healthy 2015!

Elizabeth Brice
Assistant Dean for Technical Services & Special Collections

By: weavered on: December 08, 2014 9:23 pm | weavered

Looking for new music to help keep you warm these winter months? Check out Amos Music Library's Spotify playlists. Our 2014 playlist has tracks from 180 different acclaimed popular artists and lasts over 11 hours. 

2014 Complete

Or, listen to our 2014 jazz mix, featuring artists such as Ginger Baker, Hiromi, and Amborse Akinmusire.

2014 Jazz

Happy listening!

By: micheljp on: December 08, 2014 10:54 am | micheljp @jpmichel

Finals week is madness and we know you're looking for a place to study. Starting today we've opened up the Center for Digital Scholarship and room 320 on the 3rd floor of King. King Library is not the only place we offer.

There's also the BEST Library, which is open until 2am all week. The Music Library is a pretty quiet place and is open until 11pm all week as is the Art & Architecture Library (which has reservable study rooms).

Make the Miami University Libraries' your home for finals and GOOD LUCK!!

By: bazelejw on: September 18, 2015 4:42 pm | bazelejw @@jwbazeley

Screenshot of Nature Genetics content sharing feature

This week, Nature Publishing Group (NPG) introduced new, experimental functionality on the platform that enables subscribers to many journals at to share a read-only version of full-text subscription articles, to support collaboration. This functionality is powered by ReadCube, which is an enhanced PDF viewer that can be used in-browser or through the ReadCube client, which is available for download for both Mac and Windows users.

What does this mean for Miami University Library patrons?

The Libraries subscribe to 16 journals on the platform with the shareable link functionality. If you are a Miami University faculty, student, or staff, you may create a shareable link to an article in one of these 16 journals and share it with anyone, including those outside of the MU community.

To create a shareable link to an article in one of the 16 journal titles, navigate to the full text (html) of an article at the platform. A Share icon appears just above and to the right of the article title. Click on the Share icon and copy and paste the Shareable Link that appears in the box (e.g., Send this link to colleagues or collaborators who don't have a subscription to the journal but would like to read the article.

For journal content that is not currently available to Miami University users, colleagues at other institutions who do subscribe to these titles may now send you a shareable link to that content.

Note that these full text articles are not open access, are read-only, and fall under's Principles and Guidelines.


By: weavered on: September 16, 2015 6:09 pm | weavered

On the evening of November 19th, Amos Music Library hosted a reception for Miami University Theatre's first performance of "Communicating Doors." Guests enjoyed a star-lit English tea party among the stacks.

Crowd at the Communicating Doors reception


By: weavered on: November 20, 2014 4:30 pm | weavered

Owen Pallett, a composer, violinist, and singer/songwriter also known as Final Fantasy, released one of the most acclaimed art pop albums of the year with "In Conflict." He has been praised for his work with bands such as Arcade Fire and for his contributions to the score for the 2013 film "Her."

If you're unfamiliar with his work, Amos Music Library created an introductory playlist via Spotify: Guide to Owen Pallett.

By: Anonymous (not verified) on: August 10, 2016 9:52 am | Anonymous

November is designated by the United States Government as Native American Heritage Month.  There is a rich history of Native American culture here at Miami University. Gain an understanding of the history of the Myaamia community and learn more about the Miami Tribe whom Miami University is named after by exploring our digital collections. Challenge yourself this month to learn about Native American culture by reading materials by or about Native Americans.  The Libraries has put together a list of resources to get you started so check it out today!

By: micheljp on: October 31, 2014 1:48 pm | micheljp @jpmichel

There's nothing like a good scare. Put yourself in a creeped-out mood with one of these hair-raising short stories.

  Ray Bradbury's "Veldt" from The Illustrated Man






  Rajesh Parameswaran's "The Infamous Bengal Ming" from I am an Executioner.






 Joyce Carol Oates's "Where are you Going, Where Have You Been?"






 Vladimir Nabokov's "Terra Incognita"






 Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"






We have hundreds more horrific and scary stories and novels in our collection.  Get spooked this weekend!

By: wallerjl on: September 22, 2015 12:38 am | wallerjl @@jenniferwaller

manuscript with proofreading marks


Have you done work you’re proud of?

Do you want to share it so that others can read and build upon it?

Institutional repositories are widely used to make scholarship freely accessible on the Web. The Scholarly Commons is Miami University’s institutional repository, and students are now eligible to deposit their work there. Share your work with the world, and reap the rewards of an open system of scholarship!

Familiarize yourself with Miami’s Scholarly Commons!
The Scholarly Commons makes research available to a wider audience, and it is administered by the Miami University Libraries to help ensure its long-term preservation. Familiarize yourself by visiting the Scholarly Commons at, and then browse the F.A.Q. at The Scholarly Commons is open to any Miami University faculty member, student, department, lab, research unit, or staff member. Submission is easy, and the Scholarly Commons accepts many different kinds of files. Anyone with access to the Internet and a web browser can search, view, and download items from the Scholarly Commons.

If you're an undergraduate student, talk with your professors about sponsoring your work!
Undergraduate work submitted to the Scholarly Commons requires a faculty sponsor. The sponsor should be the professor who is most familiar with the work you would like to submit and who can vouch for its originality and quality. Your professors will be happy to help you get your work out there, and the process is easy. So ask a professor today! Your work will help increase Miami University’s visibility, prestige, and public value. Even better, it will help you by providing a place where you can showcase your work!

Understand why institutional repositories such as the Scholarly Commons are important!
View a 3 ½ minute video about institutional repositories on YouTube to better understand how institutional repositories work and why they’re important. This short video is from James Neal at Columbia University, and the same concepts apply to Miami’s Scholarly Commons. Just go to


Follow the conversations on Twitter!
Follow @miamiuoa, @miamiulibraries, @R2RC, and @SPARC_NA to keep up with ongoing developments about open access and institutional repositories. #oaweek

Image credit: 2008-01-26 (Editing a paper) - 19 © Nic McPhee. Used under a CC BY-SA 2.0 license.